Strange Horizons: Past, present and the probable future

14 08 2014

One of the last untouched islands of Singapore, Pulau Jong, is seen with the first to be developed for industrial use, Pulau Bukom Besar (on the right), and its smaller neighbour Pulau Bukom Kechil – a juxtaposition perhaps of past, present, and perhaps the probable future.

JeromeLim-8431s

Pulau Bukom Besar’s development goes back to the 1890s when Shell established a kerosene storage facility on the island, then deemed a safe distance away from the main island of Singapore, outside the then port limits. The age of industrialisation in Singapore brought with it the refinery that Shell built – which heralded the start of Singapore involvement with the oil refining business, in 1961. The expansion into Pulau Bukom Kechil began in the 1970s. More on this can be found on a previous post: Snake Island at dawn through the darkness of the storm.

Sadly for Pulau Jong and its large fringing reef, a 2013 Land Use Plan seems to show that future plans could involve its absorption into a larger land mass through reclamation, joining it with the islands of Pulau Sebarok to its southeast and the enlarged Pulau Semakau (now Singapore’s offshore landfill) to its southwest.





The ICON de Martell Cordon Bleu 2014

12 08 2014

The prestigious photography award that recognises the Singapore best of the best in photography, the ICON de Martell Cordon Bleu, returns for a fifth year. As with the award of the previous years, an exhibition of works of the award nominees will be held, this time around in conjunction with the Singapore Night Festival at the Stamford Gallery of the National Museum of Singapore from 20 August to 5 September.

Lavender Chang: Eldest Daughter (2011)

An additional highlight of the exhibition will be an interactive room on which Martell and ICON de Martell Cordon Bleu 2013 winner Sarah Choo have collaborated on. The presentation will attempt to draw parallels between both photography and cognac making and is intended to convey the message of how discernment in the details is important to both.

Wilfred Lim: Superhero (From the series ‘Self Portraits’, 2013)

Jeannie Ho: Brunch Is The Order Of The Day (From the series ‘All In Between’, 2012)

Also to look forward to during the period of the exhibition is the visit of Martell Heritage Ambassador Christophe Pienkowksi, formerly a chef at the Chateau de Chanteloup (where Martell entertains its guests). Pienkowski’s gastronomic expertise and knowledge of Martell cognacs lends to the expert pairing of different cuisines with the various marques of Martell cognacs for which he will share and make recommendations. 

Eugene Soh: Venus & Grace Edition 30 (2012)

During the period of the exhibition, visitors will also be able to complete the Martell experience at a pop-up bar that will serve Martell cognacs and cocktails.

Ang Song Nian: Detour No. 3 (From the series ‘Many Detours : Washed-­‐out & Interrupted’, 2011)

The nominees for the award this year are:
  • Ang Song Nian
  • Eugene Soh
  • Jeannie Ho
  • Ken Cheong
  • Lavender Chang
  • Neo Xiaobin
  • Wilfred Lim
More information on last year’s awards and winners can be found at this link.




Singapore Art Museum – National Day Open House 2014

8 08 2014

Event Listing

In celebration of Singapore’s National Day, the Singapore Art Museum is opening its doors to the public with free admission to the museum and participation in various family art activities. Free workshops and activities have been organised to coincide with the newly opened exhibition Sensorium 360º. Visitors are able to create their own artworks, inspired by Singapore’s National Day and the artworks of Sensorium 360º.

ACTIVITY HIGHLIGHTS

ACTIVITY: COLLABORATIVE MURAL

VENUE: SAM Level 2 Lobby

TIME: 11.00 am to 6.00 pm

This collaborative artwork celebrates National Day by involving participants the creation of a mural with cityscape and landmarks of Singapore. Participants can contribute by drawing well-known Singapore landmarks, as well as personal landmarks such as houses, people, cars, etc. This mural will be displayed at SAM throughout National Day.

Singapore Art Museum_National Day Open House_2014-4

Singapore Art Museum_National Day Open House_2014-1

ACTIVITY: DARK ROOM

VENUE: SAM Gallery 3.7

TIME: 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm, 5pm

DURATION: 45 minutes

Inspired by Sensorium 360° artwork, Unseen: Touch Field by Alicia Neo, this activity encompasses the experience of craft making in a dark room setting and allows the participants to rely solely on their sense of touch. Participants will create shapes and forms using materials such as beans and beads by following verbal instructions.

ACTIVITY: NATIONAL DAY KALEIDOSCOPE

VENUE: SAM Glass Hall

TIME: 11am, 12pm, 1pm, 2pm, 3pm, 4pm, 5pm

DURATION: 45 minutes

Inspired by Sensorium 360° artwork, The Overview Installation by Eugene Soh, which transforms the way we see the world, participants will create a kaleidoscope to celebrate National Day through intriguing fragments of colours and patterns.

Singapore Art Museum_National Day Open House_2014-3

Singapore Art Museum_National Day Open House_2014-2

For more details, please visit the Singapore Art Museum website at http://www.singaporeartmuseum.





Sensorium 360°

8 08 2014

Sensorium 360° Logo_Image Courtesy of the Singapore Art Museum sEVENT LISTING

The Singapore Art Museum is proud to present Sensorium 360°: Contemporary Art and the Sensed World, an interactive exhibition of contemporary art that reveals the complexity of the human senses, and explores how sensory experiences locate us in understanding the world and knowing the self. 11 artists from Singapore and wider Asia – including Thailand, Vietnam, the Philippines, Indonesia, and China – will give expression to 9 different senses, peeling back the multiple layers of sensory relationships that inform our personal well- being.

Sensorium 360° will run from 31 July 2014 to 22 October 2014 at the SAM. In addition to the exhibition, the museum will be holding parallel programmes including curatorial tours, educators’ talks, and sensory workshops.


AUGUST 2014

Awakening the Senses – of Herbs, Spices and Roots

Dates: Friday, 8 August 2014

Time: 7pm – 8:30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$19. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Take part in this introductory workshop on how our olfactory and gustatory senses work both independently and together to enable us to enjoy the food and drinks we consume. Learn how herbs, spices and roots should be handled and how they may be used in creating simple mocktails in a demonstration and hands-on workshop, where participants will learn how to concoct their own mocktails. This workshop is conducted by BarSmiths, a specialist in bartending and mixology.


SEPTEMBER 2014

Guest Talk: Listening to the Universe by Honor Harger

Date: Friday, 5 September 2014

Time: 7.30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

Limited spaces. To pre-register, please email education@singaporeartmuseum.sg

For more information, please visit http://www.singaporeartmuseum.sg/programmes/index.html

In this talk, Honor Harger will explore the sounds of the sky, using art to connect her audience to the universe. Sound waves cannot propagate in the vacuum of space, and the stars and planets are not directly audible. However, radio waves emitted from celestial bodies can be turned into sound by ordinary radio receivers speakers that convert electrical signals into sound waves. Using this century-old process, the universe becomes ‘soundful’ — this is all possible due to the science of radio astronomy. This talk will show us how radio enables us to hear something which is physically present, but imperceptible to our senses.

The Colours of Tea

Dates: Saturday, 13 September 2014

Time: 1.30pm – 2.30pm and 3.30pm – 4.30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$20. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Understand the different types of unblended teas and let them stir your senses. This tea tasting workshop actively engages the sensory experiences. Participants will use their sense of smell and taste to evoke certain memories from various aromas of teas. Participants will taste teas across six categories from different tea-growing regions in the world. This workshop is conducted by Pekoe & Imp, who has been conducting tea tasting sessions since 2011.

Awakening the Senses – of Herbs, Spices and Roots

Dates: Saturday, 20 September 2014

Time: 2pm – 3.30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$19. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Take part in this introductory workshop on how our olfactory and gustatory senses work both independently and together to enable us to enjoy the food and drinks we consume. Learn how herbs, spices and roots should be handled and how they may be used in creating simple mocktails in a demonstration and hands-on workshop, where participants will learn how to concoct their own mocktails. This workshop is conducted by BarSmiths, a specialist in bartending and mixology.

Sensorium 360° Curator Tour: Racing Through the Senses

Dates: Friday, 19 September 2014

Saturday, 20 September 2014 / Sunday, 21 September 2014

Time: 4.30 pm – 5:30 pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$18. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Indulge the need for speed and catch up on the latest in Singapore and Southeast Asia’s contemporary art at the Singapore Art Museum. Led by our curators, take a spin through our latest exhibition – Sensorium 360° – a visual art exhibition that moves beyond vision to ‘see’ the world through the other senses, then end your visit with a glass of sparkling wine served in our courtyard.

Taste of Perfume

Dates: Saturday, 27 September 2014

Time: 2pm – 3.30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$20. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Did you know that certain scents are edible? Learn about different perfume ingredients and explore how these ingredients affect the human body. Participants will also get totaste various types of edible perfume. This workshop is conducted by Prachi Saini from Je T’aime Perfumery. She has been conducting workshops on perfumery since 2006.

Creating and Reading Braille

Dates: Sunday, 28 September 2014

Time: 2pm – 3.30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$20. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. All proceeds of this workshop will be channeled to Singapore Association of the Visually Handicapped.
Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Gain better insight and understanding of this unique technique through a customized braille reading workshop with our visually impaired facilitators from Singapore Association of the Visually Handicapped (SAVH). After a basic introduction to Braille, participants will take part in a hands-on session to create messages using braille writing frames!


OCTOBER 2014

The Colours of Tea

Dates: Saturday, 4 October 2014

Time: 1.30pm – 2.30pm

3.30pm – 4.30pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$20. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Understand the different types of unblended teas and let them stir your senses. This tea tasting workshop actively engages the sensory experiences. Participants will use their sense of smell and taste to evoke certain memories from various aromas of teas. Participants will taste teas across six categories from different tea-growing regions in the world. This workshop is conducted by Pekoe & Imp, who has been conducting tea tasting sessions since 2011.

Create Your Signature Perfume

Dates: Sunday, 19 October 2014

Time: 2pm – 4pm

Venue: Singapore Art Museum

$20. Tickets available at SAM and SISTIC. Limited spaces. For ticket availability at the door, please call SISTIC.

Join us in this hands-on workshop and explore how to translate your personality into your own signature scent, using various exotic scents and oils. Participants will bring home a custom-made 30ml bottle of their own signature perfume after the workshop. This workshop is conducted by Prachi Saini from Je T’aime Perfumery. She has been conducting workshops on perfumery since 2006.


For more details, please visit the Singapore Art Museum website at http://www.singaporeartmuseum.sg/





The bloodstained cliffs south of Sentosa

7 08 2014

Unlike its better known northern companion, the isle of Peace and Tranquility, Sentosa, the island of Pulau Tekukor is one that rarely gets a mention. Named in Malay after the rather benign spotted-neck dove – tekukur (as it is spelt today) is derived from the sound the bird makes, the name, so it seems, masks quite a sinister past.

A tekukur in flight.

A tekukur in flight.

Pulau Tekukor or Dove Island - hear stories of its past when it was known as Pulau Penyabong and its association with the origins of the former name of Sentosa, Pulau Blakang Mati.

Pulau Tekukor or Dove Island.

If one of the forgotten stories of our shores are to be believed, a curse was said to have been placed on Pulau Tekukor and despite the island’s welcoming sandy beaches, the island is one that unlike its immediate neighbours, has never been inhabited. The curse, one that left its soil incapable of supporting any useful plant life as well as leaving it without a source of freshwater, as the story goes, is a result of the island’s violent past, a past that does provide a possible explanation as to how the nearby island of Sentosa acquired its mysterious previous name,  Pulau Blakang Mati (the island of death at the back).

The eastern end of Sentosa today with Terumbu Buran in the foreground.

The paradise end of Sentosa today with Terumbu Buran in the foreground, now an isle for the living.

Pulau Tekukor was once itself, known by another name, Pulau Penyabong. Penyabung (as penyabong is spelt today), as is used in more recent times, has connotations of bloody confrontations, having been associated with the cruel but once popular sport of cockfighting. The fights, however, that were thought to have taken place on the island, so that blood not stain the soils of the more sacredly held islands, involved creatures not of the feathered kind. Pitting keris wielding Malay and Bugis warriors of the old world, these confrontations were duels to the death, for which the reward for the vanquished, was a final journey to be buried on an island that now for some, does seem like paradise on earth.

Another view of Tekukor a.k.a. Penyabong, Sisters' Islands can be seen to its south-west. The channel on the west of the island, Sisters Fairway is also known as Selat Tanjong Hakim.

Another view of Tekukor a.k.a. Penyabong, Sisters’ Islands can be seen to its south-west. The channel on the west of the island, Sisters Fairway is also known as Selat Tanjong Hakim.

Besides the curiously named Pulau Blakang Mati, another name that is thought to be linked to the bloody battles, is Selat Tanjong Hakim (now more commonly referred to Sisters’ Fairway in navigation charts). Hakim being the Malay word for judge – the selat or strait west of Penyabong, would have watched over the duels, in the same way a judge might have presided over the fights.

Another view of the former Pulau Blakang Mati.

Another view of the former Pulau Blakang Mati.

As Pulau Tekukor, the island became a commercial explosives storage facility for the Port of Singapore Authority (PSA) in the 1980s- after the island was enlarged by reclamation of its western shores. There was also a proposal to turn it into a sanctuary for long-tailed macaques that surfaced in the mid 2000s that did not take off and as of today, there are no known plans for the island and the island remains as mysterious as it long has been.

The sandy beaches and 'bloodstained' cliff faces of Tekukor.

The sandy beaches and ‘bloodstained’ cliff faces of Tekukor.

In its cliff faces that are still seen today – stained by the blood of the fallen, there perhaps is the only reminder of the story of the island; a tale that, as with the many stories from our islands handed down through the generations telling us of a past we long have discarded, may never again be told.





A paddle through the magical watery woods

30 07 2014

The process of acquainting myself with the shores of Singapore for a project I am working on, Points of Departure, has provided me with some incredible experiences. One that I was especially grateful to have had was the experience of paddling through a green watery space that is almost magical in its beauty. Set in the relatively unspoilt lower reaches of Sungei Khatib Bongsu, one of Singapore’s last un-dammed rivers, the space is one that seems far out of place in the Singapore of today and holds in and around its many estuarine channels, one of the largest concentration of mangroves east of the Causeway along the island’s northern coast.

Paddling through the watery forest at Sungei Khatib Bongsu.

Paddling through the watery forest at Sungei Khatib Bongsu.

The much misunderstood mangrove forest, is very much a part of Singapore’s natural heritage. The watery forests, had for long, dominated much of Singapore’s coastal and estuarine areas, accounting for as much as an estimated 13% of Singapore’s land area at the time of the arrival of the British. Much has since been lost through development and reclamation and today, the area mangrove forests occupy amount to less that 1% of Singapore’s expanded land area. It is in such forests that we find a rich diversity of plant and animal life. Mangroves, importantly, also serve as nurseries for aquatic life as well as act as natural barriers that help protect our shorelines from erosion.

Khatib Bongsu is a watery but very green world.

Khatib Bongsu is a watery but very green world.

The island’s northern coast was especially rich in mangrove forests. Much has however, been cleared through the course of the 19th and 20th centuries, with large tracts being lost during the construction of the airbase at Seletar and the naval base at Sembawang in the early 1900s. The mangroves of the north, spread along the coast as well as inland through its many estuaries, along with those found across the strait in Johor, were once the domain of the Orang Seletar. A nomadic group of boat dwellers, the Orang Seletar had for long, featured in the Johor or Tebrau Strait, living off the sea and the mangroves; finding safe harbour in bad weather within the relatively sheltered mangrove lined estuaries.

Mangrove forests had once dominated much of coastal Singapore.

Mangrove forests had once dominated much of coastal Singapore.

Boat dwelling Orang Seletar families could apparently be found along Singapore’s northern coast until as recently as the 1970s. While the Orang Seletar in Singapore have, over the course of time, largely been assimilated into the wider Malay community, the are still communities of Orang Seletar across the strait in Johor. Clinging on to their Orang Seletar identity, the nine communities there live no longer on the water, but on the land in houses close to the water.

Safe harbour in the watery woods.

Safe harbour in the watery woods.

It is the labyrinth of tree shaded channels and the remnants of its more recent prawn farming past that makes the side of the right bank of Sungei Khatib Bongsu’s lower reaches an especially interesting area to kayak through. Much has since been reclaimed by the mangrove forest and although there still is evidence of human activity in the area, it is a wonderfully green and peaceful space that brings much joy to to the rower.

The canalised upper part of Sungei Khatib Bongsu.

The canalised upper part of Sungei Khatib Bongsu.

The area around Sungei Khatib Bongsu today, as seen on Google Maps.

The area around Sungei Khatib Bongsu today, as seen on Google Maps.

Paddling through the network of channels and bund encircled former prawn ponds – accessible through the concrete channels that once were their sluice gates, the sounds that are heard are mostly of the mangrove’s many avian residents. It was however the shrill call of one of the mangrove’s more diminutive winged creatures, the Ashy Tailorbird, that seemed to dominate, a call that could in the not too distant future, be drowned out by the noise of the fast advancing human world.  It is just north of Yishun Avenue 6, where the frontier seems now to be, that we see a wide barren patch. The patch is one cleared of its greenery so that a major road – an extension of Admiralty Road East, can be built; a sign that time may soon be called on an oasis that for long has been a sanctuary for a rich and diverse avian population.

The walk into the mangroves.

The walk into the mangroves.

The beginnings of a new road.

The beginnings of a new road.

The Sungei Khatib Bongsu mangroves, lies in an area between Sungei Khatib Bongsu and the left bank of Sungei Seletar at its mouth that lies beyond the Lower Seletar Dam that has been designated as South Simpang; at the southern area of a large plot of land reserved for public housing that will become the future Simpang New Town. The area is one that is especially rich in bird life, attracting a mix of  resident and migratory species and was a major breeding site for Black-crowned Night Herons, a herony that has fallen victim to mosquito fogging. While there is little to suggest that the herons will return to breed, the area is still one where many rare and endangered species of birds continue to be sighted and while kayaking through, what possibly was a critically endangered Great-billed Heron made a graceful appearance.

Evidence of the former prawn ponds.

Evidence of the former prawn ponds.

Kayaking into the ponds.

Kayaking into the former ponds.

It is for the area’s rich biodiversity that the Nature Society (Singapore) or NSS has long campaigned for its preservation and a proposal for its conservation was submitted by the NSS as far back as in 1993. This did seem to have some initial success and the area, now used as a military training area into which access is largely restricted, was identified as a nature area for conservation, as was reflected in the first issue of the Singapore Green Plan. Its protection as a nature area seemed once again confirmed by the then Acting Minister for National Development, Mr Lim Hng Kiang, during the budget debate on 18 March 1994 (see: Singapore Parliament Reports), with the Minister saying: “We have acceded to their (NSS) request in priorities and we have conserved Sungei Buloh Bird Sanctuary and Khatib Bongsu“. 

JeromeLim-7437

Unfortunately, the area has failed to make a reappearance in subsequently releases of the list of nature area for conservation, an omission that was also seen in subsequent editions of the Singapore Green Plan. What we now see consistently reflected in the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) Master Plans (see: Master Plan), is that as part of a larger reserve area for the future Simpang, the area’s shoreline stands to be altered by the reclamation of land. Along with land reclamation, plans the Public Utilities Board (PUB) appears to have for Sungei Khatib Bongsu’s conversion into a reservoir that will also include the neighbouring Sungei Simpang under Phase 2 of the Seletar-Serangoon Scheme (SRSS), does mean that the future of the mangroves is rather uncertain.

A resident that faces an uncertain future.

A resident that faces an uncertain future.

Phase 2 of the SRSS involves the impounding of Sungei Khatib Bongsu, Sungei Simpang and Sungei Seletar to create the Coastal Seletar Reservoir. Based on the 2008 State of the Environment Report, this was to be carried out in tandem with land reclamation along the Simpang and Sembawang coast. The reclamation could commence as early as next year, 2015 (see State of the Environment 2008 Report Chapter 3: Water).

JeromeLim-7503

In the meantime, the NSS does continue with its efforts to bring to the attention of the various agencies involved in urban planning of the importance of the survival of the mangroves at Khatib Bongsu. Providing feedback to the URA on its Draft Master Plan in 2013 (see Feedback on the Updated URA Master Plan, November 2013), the NSS highlights the following:

Present here is the endangered mangrove tree species, Lumnitzera racemosa, listed in the Singapore Red Data Book (RDB). Growing plentifully by the edge and on the mangrove is the Hoya diversifolia. On the whole the mangrove here is extensive and healthy, with thicker stretches along Sg Khatib Bongsu and the estuary of Sg Seletar. 

A total of 185 species of birds, resident and migratory, have been recorded at the Khatib Bongsu  area. This comes to 49 % of the total number of bird species in Singapore (376, Pocket Checklist 2011, unpublished  )  – almost comparable to that at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve. 13 bird species found here are listed in the RDB  and among these are:  Rusty-breasted Cuckoo, Straw-headed Bulbul, Ruddy Kingfisher, Grey-headed Fish Eagle, Changeable Hawk Eagle, White-chested Babbler, etc. The Grey-headed Fish Eagle  and the Changeable Hawk eagle are nesting in the Albizia woodlands in this area.

The mangrove dependent species present are : Crab-eating Frog, Dog-faced Water Snake & Malaysian Wood Rat. The Malaysian Wood Rat is regarded is locally uncommon.   In 2000, Banded Krait (RDB species) was found here near the edge mangrove. Otters, probably the Smooth Otter, have been sighted by fishermen and birdwatchers in the abandoned fish ponds and the Khatib Bongsu river. 

URA Master Plan 2014, showing the reserve area at Simpang.

URA Master Plan 2014, showing the reserve area at Simpang.

JeromeLim-7484
It will certainly be a great loss to Singapore should the PUB and the Housing and Development Board (HDB) proceed with their plans for the area. What we stand to lose is not just another regenerated green patch, but a part of our natural heritage that as a habitat for the diverse array of plant and animals many of which are at risk of disappearing altogether from our shores, is one that can never be replaced.

The present shoreline at Simpang, threatened by possible future land reclamation.

The present shoreline at Simpang, threatened by possible future land reclamation.

The white sands at Tanjong Irau, another shoreline under threat of the possible future Simpang-Sembawang land reclamation.

The white sands at Tanjong Irau, another shoreline under threat of the possible future Simpang-Sembawang land reclamation.





Watch The World Wars tonight on History

26 07 2014

Event Listing

Close to 70 years since the end of the Second World War, there are still many physically reminders left of the dark and painful period of our history that can be found amongst the new Singapore we have become. However, for the many of us today, for whom the war was a dark moment in history, it would be hard to imagine the motivations of those who led their countries into battle as well as the horrors faced by the troops at the frontline.

The chapel and murals were a light in the darkness of captivity during the dark days of World War II.

A reminder of the war in Singapore, the Changi Murals, in the Chapel of St. Luke.

Recounting not just the horrors of the World Wars, but also how the two great wars were very much interlinked, including how some of the experiences gained by individuals during the first, motivated their decisions as men leading their countries into battle in the second, is The World Wars. A three-night event series, The World Wars looks back at the war years through the eyes of the powerful men of the time — Roosevelt, Hitler, Patton, Mussolini, Churchill, Tojo, DeGaulle and MacArthur.

This special event series commemorates the 100th anniversary of a turning point in the world’s history, where the old world of kings and empires collided with the new world of machine guns, where the old rules of engagement bowed before new and previously unthinkable form of warfare. Where one generation of men, fought two wars and changed the world. The series airs on HISTORY (StarHub TV Ch. 401), July 26 – 28, 10pm.

The World Wars received three 2014 Primetime Emmy Nominations for:
1. Outstanding Documentary or Non-fiction Series
2. Outstanding Writing for Non-fiction Programming
3. Outstanding Sound Editing for Nonfiction Programming (Single or Multi-camera)

For more information about The World Wars, check out: http://specials.historyasia.com/worldwars/index.html.

About The World Wars 

The World Wars is a three-night event series which looks back at the war years through the eyes of the powerful men of the time — Roosevelt, Hitler, Patton, Mussolini, Churchill, Tojo, DeGaulle and MacArthur. This special event series will honor the 100th anniversary of a decisive turning point in our history, where the old world of kings and empires collided with the new world of machine guns. Where the old rules of engagement bowed before tanks and chemical warfare. Where one generation of men, fought two wars and changed the world.

Interesting Facts

- The World Wars premieres to 3.4 million total viewers in U.S.

- U.S President Obama will be introducing Night One (Episode 1, 26th July at 10pm) of the six-part event series that takes viewers on an epic and groundbreaking ride through the bloodiest century in history.

- The series features gripping dramatic scenes, stunning CGI visuals and interviews with contemporary leaders, including John McCain, Colin Powell, John Major and David Miliband, along with noted historians from around the world.

The World Wars








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,402 other followers

%d bloggers like this: