Celebrating Singapore


There’s enough about Singapore to celebrate!

Singapore, once described as the crossroads of Asia, is an island where many cultures and religions have come together. The Singapore we see today, is one that has developed from a wealth of influences, influences which have come with the many arrivals to its shores for close to two centuries, not just from the West and the Far East, but also from exotic places such as the streets of old Baghdad and the highlands of the southern Caucasus. It is behind the ultra modern mask of more recent time, that, despite it shedding much that had to do with its past, we find many examples of the cultures and religions that the mix of immigrants have brought with them, each adding to the spectrum of colour in Singapore’s food, festivals and religious observances, and the many styles of architecture found along many of its streets.

Cultural Expressions

Religious Festivals

Religious Architecture

Hidden Places

Colourful Spaces


Cultural Expressions

Chingay 2012

Bangsawan (Malay Opera)

Chinese Puppetry

Teochew Opera (Ubin)

Getai

Teochew Opera (Thau Yong)

Kuda Kepang

Wayang Kulit

Contemporary Dance

Chinese New Year

Moon Cake Festival

Ramadan in Geylang Serai

Vanishing Trades

Chingay 2013

River Hongbao

Getai on Ubin

Songwriter Natalie Hiong

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Religious Festivals

Ramadan

Thaipusam

Hungry Ghosts Festival

Panguni Uthiram

Pongal

Good Friday

Silver Chariot Procession

Tua Pek Kong’s Birthday (Ubin)

Guru Nanak Jayanti

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Religious Architecture

Sultan’s Mosque

Sri Srinivasa Perumal

St. Joseph’s Church

Chesed-El Synagogue

Hong San See

Blessed Sacrament Church

Masjid Hang Jebat

Mun Sun Fook Tuck Chee

Good Shepherd Cathedral

St. Andrew’s Cathedral

Sri Veeramakaliamman

St. Joseph’s (Bt Timah)

Thian Hock Keng

Fuk Tak Chi

Nagore Durgha

Maghain Aboth Synagogue

Armenian Church

Chruch of the Sacred Heart

Nativity Church

Sts Peter and Paul

Good Shepherd Cathedral (Restoration)

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Hidden Places

Thow Kwang Dragon Kiln

The Pier

398 Canteen

The Pearl of Chinatown

The Last Post Standing

Lost on the Ridge

Inside a Conservation Shophouse

A Secret Hideaway

Bukit Brown Cemetery

The Last Village

Osborne House

The Japanese Cemetery

Remnant of Hun Yeang Village

Former Khinco Factory

The Former Naval Dockyard

The actual Changi Murals

Selarang Camp

Tombs of Malayan Princes


Colourful Spaces

Streets of Sin and Salvation

The Village of Lime

The Back Lane

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