A final journey: a tearful departure from Tanjong Pagar

3 07 2011

This post is the first of a series intended to capture the final journey that many who joined me on the last day of operations of Tanjong Pagar Railway Station on the 30th of June 2011 took out of Tanjong Pagar on a rainy morning and back into Tanjong Pagar on Last Train into Tanjong Pagar. There were a hundred in all that did, people from all walks of life who did. For many the closure of the station was a sad occasion, particularly those with personal experiences of a journey through the station which was opened in 1932, and the ride was to be a final homecoming into the grand old station. For some others, it was a first journey through Tanjong Pagar to say that they have had that wonderful experience of a journey through a grand station that adds to the romance of travel that is missing from other modes of transport. For all who went on the journey, it was also a journey to mark the historic occasion as well as one to preserve the memory of the railway’s passage through Singapore that had started with the Singapore to Kranji Railway in 1903, as well as to say a huge thank you to the dedicated men and women who tirelessly kept the railway running.

Many others had in the days leading up to the closure queued up for tickets for their own final journeys through Tanjong Pagar.

Tickets for the final journey.

For me, it had started as a personal journey, having had a fascination for the railway since my early days and having an attachment to the magnificent station and train journeys out of and back into the station from the many trips I have taken through it. It was a journey that I had intended from the day I had heard the news of the station’s closure, and what had started with an exchange of tweets on the 15th of May which started with one I had sent about a post I made in which I mentioned that Sultan of Johor intending to drive the last train out to which a friend and fellow traveller replied to. In my reply, I stated my intention of taking the last train in, and she thought that it was a good idea as she had her own personal attachment to the trains and thought it would be good if we could get a few more in our extended circle of friends on Twitter to join us. I suppose it was the media coverage that followed that made it more than a personal journey for us, first in the Lianhe Zaobao on the 29th of May and then after a Facebook page was created on the 1st of June when some of us who intended the journey had purchased tickets to provide updates to those who had initially responded, the Straits Times caught on to it and featured it on the Life section of the paper on the 8th of June (the news was also in the days to come, reported by the UK’s Daily Telegraph and also by the Japanese media). Since then, the Facebook page has grown from 80 ‘likes’ before the Straits Times feature to something like 600 on the morning of the final day (with coverage by the various media including Channel NewsAsia on the day itself – it has since grown to over 1000). That I guess made it into a journey by not just individuals, but by a community of people to commemorate the last day and to have one last homecoming into a station that many will miss. The series of posts of which the first starts at Tanjong Pagar Railway Station, will follow what was to be a meaningful experience for many on the train on a journey out of the station and a return to amazing scenes along the railway corridor on the last train into Tanjong Pagar.

I

a tearful departure from Tanjong Pagar

0711: Arriving at the station for one final walk through the arches to catch a train.

0720: Tears start to stream down from the heavens on the final day of the station's operations.

0738: A handful of passengers were buying tickets out to JB.

0739: A last look around the station ... M Hasan 2 in the main hall is shuttered and emptiness greets the passenger where the Habib Railway Book Store and Money Changer once stood at the entrance to the arrival platform.

0740: A quick glance at what used to be M. Hasan Food Station on the arrival platform.

0741: A group of old timers who have hung out at the station for many years are seen having a last breakfast at what used to be M Hasan.

0741: Wall fans that were used to cool hungry passengers on the arrival platform prepare for their journey to the next destination.

0742: Where hungry passengers were once fed ...

0743: The queue for the train at the departure gates ...

0744: The station's staff look out for one last look down a deserted departure platform as the rain continues to fall.

0758: The main hall of the station is filled with passengers and KTM staff to see out the last day of the station's operations.

0805: A ticketing clerk smiles through the window of the ticketing counter.

0809: With the departure of the 0800 delayed, there is time to have a wander around the ticket counter when a familiar sign coily peeps out from behind another familiar sign at the ticket counter.

0828: The gate finally opens at 0820 ... and the last few passengers for the 0800 Ekspres Rakyat take one last walk through the departure gate, as a NHK film crew is seen filming them.

0829: A final glance at the departure gate.

0831: Some passengers seen making one last dash down a rain washed and otherwise quiet departure platform, in contrast to the frenzy that I met on my very first encounter with the departure platform.

0832: Passengers taking a final photograph on the departure platform.

0833: All aboard ... the Ekspres Rakyat prepares for a final departure from the station.

0838: The Ekspres Rakyat moves off for one last time.


Posts on the Railway through Singapore and on the Green Corridor:

I have also put together a collection of experiences and memories of the railway in Singapore and of my journeys through the grand old station which can be found through this page: “Journeys through Tanjong Pagar“.

Do also take a look at the proposal by the Nature Society (Singapore) to retain the green areas that have been preserved by the existence of the railway through Singapore and maintain it as a Green Corridor, at the Green Corridor’s website and show your support by liking the Green Corridor’s Facebook page. My own series of posts on the Green Corridor are at: “Support the Green Corridor“.



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