The SGF Orchid Show

21 04 2018

President Halimah Yacob was treated to colourful displays of orchids at the Singapore Garden Festival (SGF) Orchid Show, which opened at the National Orchid Garden today. The show, one of three flower and horticultural shows being held for the first time as part of the SGF – now in its seventh edition, sees NParks partnering the Orchid Society of South East Asia (OSSEA) in anticipation of Singapore hosting the Asia Pacific Orchid Conference in 2022. Running from 21 to 29 April, it sees over 100 varieties of orchids on display. One of the show’s highlights is the 17 landscape displays found at the Orchid Plaza, 13 of which are competitive.

President Halimah Yacob viewing an orchid display at the show.

An interesting development that was announced by Mr. Lawrence Wong, Minister for National Development and Second Minister for Finance in his address at the opening was of the Botanic Gardens’ Seed Bank. Expected to be completed in 2019, it will occupy the largest of five colonial houses – House 4 – within Raffles College. Singapore’s first seed bank, it will play an important role in the conservation of plant species from Southeast Asia that are under threat and will have the capacity to hold seeds from some 25,000 species of plants. The facility, which besides laboratories, processing rooms and storage freezers, will also have interpretative galleries for visitors. The efforts are supported by HSBC, who madea donation of $103,000 through the NParks Garden City Fund.

Mr Lawrence Wong at the Opening.

More on the SGF Orchid Show, which opens from 8.30 am to 7.00 pm daily until 29 April and is free for all Singapore residents, can be found at the NParks website.

President Halimah Yacob and Mr Lawrence Wong viewing a landscape display at Orchid Plaza.

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The jamban @ Armenian Street

20 04 2018

Happening this weekend (20-21 April) along Armenian Street – the annual Armenian Street Party, which this year, aims to transport you back to the good old kampung days complete with a jamban (makeshift toilet). The jamban, one that its creator Hafiz Osman recalls from Kampong Bugis, is one of several site-specific installations that visitors to the party can interact with at the Substation and the Peranakan Museum over the two days. Lots of talks, interactive installations, food, music and performances! More information at http://peranakanmuseum.org.sg/programmes/festivals/armenian-street-party-2018.

Jamban 1956 by Hafiz Osman.

A perfectly framed photo taking spot for Amek Gambar – for an upcoming exhibition on photography at the Peranakan Museum.

Peranakan Museum GM John Teo with the cast of Si Nyonya Manis – a display of Peranakan fashion and music presented by True Blue.

A real time projection in the dark room of We Stop to Watch the World Go By at the Peranakan Museum.

Members of the Armenian Street Party “Cast”.

The dizzying reflections of OH! Corak Corak at the Peranakan Museum – highly instagrammable trip through a little nyonya’s imagined instagram account!

Flower Power!





Limited Edition State Property Pin Giveaway

6 04 2018

[Giveaway]


Do you have a special memory of any State properties? Or perhaps a recommendation for the next Discovering Singapore’s Best Kept Secrets #SLASecretSpaces tour?

Share photos of your favourite State property1 with an accompanying caption on Instagram with the hashtag #SLAStateProperty. Every week, 3 lucky winners – with the most eye-catching photos – will receive a limited edition SLA State Property pin.

To take part, tag @singaporelandauthority and @jeronimoloco in your posts and set your Instagram profile to public. Submit your entries by 2359 hours every Thursday3. The giveaway is opened only to Singapore residents. Winners will be notified via Instagram.

JeromeLim_0551

The first pin design for the giveaway, one of the former Kinloss House.

JeromeLim_0552

The eight different designs – one from each of the State Properties visits made in 2017.


Notes:
1State Property currently managed by the Singapore Land Authority.
2There are a total of 8 different pin designs. Pins of one design will given out each week.
3 The qualifying period for each week’s giveaway will be from Friday to Thursday (Singapore Time), commencing on Friday 6 April 2018.


Examples of State Property managed by SLA

(State Property managed by SLA can be identified via ‘Land Query’ option on OneMap)

The former Singapore Turf Club (now re-purposed as The Grandstand).

The Johore Battery site at  27 Cosford Rd.

The former Bukit Timah Fire Station.

Command House at Kheam Hock Road, a National Monument.

Old Changi Hospital, built originally as barrack buildings for the Royal Engineers stationed at Changi Garrison. It was converted into a RAF hospital in 1947.

The former Pasir Panjang ‘A’ Power Station – Singapore’s second power station.

The former Alkaff Mansion at Mount Washington.

Block 450 in the former Seletar Air Base, built as a barrack block for RAF Seletar.

A conserved row at Orchard Road, one of which was the former Malayan Motors showroom.

Thow Kwang Dragon Kiln, one of two surviving Teochew kilns.

Bukit Timah Saddle Club.

Old Admiralty House, built as a residence for the Commander of the Naval Base.


 





The passing of an old neighbourhood

5 04 2018

Old HDB neighbourhoods are a joy. Their many reminders of a gentler age, some found in old shops and kopitiams in which time seems to have left well behind, extend a welcome clearly absent in the brave new that modern Singapore has become. Sadly, it won’t be long before modernity catches up on these places. Our national obsession with renewal does mean that it will only be a question of when that these spaces will forever be lost.

One old neighbourhood experiencing a slow death by renewal is Tanglin Halt. Built in the early 1960s, its old flats – among the first that the HDB built – have already begun to make way for the new. Even before this several of the neighbourhood’s landmarks were already lost. These included the rather iconic blue city gas holder and the factories that were home to several household names such as Setron. Many of the factories, which provided the neighbourhood’s folk with employment, went in the 1990s at the end of the sites’ respective leases.  A cluster of towering new flats now mark the neighbourhood. Used in part to house the first residents displaced by the Selective En-bloc Redevelopment Scheme (SERS) in the neighbourhood, the cluster has also introduced a dash of modernity to the old neighbourhood with modern shops, an air-conditioned food court, and a supermarket.  The flats that were affected by SERS, referred to collectively as the “Chap Lau Chu“, were only very recently demolished with a new batch of flats soon to fill the space .

Renewal, even gradual, is taking its toll on the businesses housed in the neighbourhood centre. Many of the surviving businesses, with the displacement of their customer base, have been left with little motivation to continue operating. A recent casualty was a provision shop by the name of Thin Huat, which closed its doors for good over the weekend. Having been set up 1964 – 54 years ago – Thin Huat is one of the neighbourhood’s oldest businesses. That makes it especially sad to see it go.

Thin Huat – a few days before its closure.

Empty shelves and a photograph of its proprietor and his wife.

 





Panguni Uthiram and a sugarcane kavadi

31 03 2018

Besides being Good Friday, the 30 of March 2018 – being the day of the full moon – also saw several other religious festivals being celebrated. One, Panguni Uthiram, is celebrated by the Hindus on the full moon day of the Tamil month of Panguni. The celebration of the festival is an especially colourful one at the Holy Tree Sri Balasubramaniar Temple and involves a kavadi procession that goes back to the latter days of the Naval Base when the temple was located off Canberra Road. This year’s celebration was also of special significance – being the first to be held at its newly consecrated rebuilt temple building.

The rebuilt Holy Tree Balasubramaniar Temple. It was consecrated in February this year.


The sugarcane kavadi

Seen at yesterday’s procession: a sugarcane kavadi. The kavadi is less commonly seen and is one with a baby slung from stalks of sugarcane that have been tied together, carried by the baby’s parents. The kavadi is used by couples to offer gratitude to Lord Murugan for the blessing of a baby.


More photographs from the procession:


Panguni Uthiram in previous years:


 





Discovering Singapore’s Best Kept Secrets during the Singapore Heritage Festival

28 03 2018

The Singapore Heritage Festival will see a repeat of three State Property guided visits from last year’s “Discovering Singapore’s Best Kept Secrets” series. Organised with the support of the Singapore Land Authority, the visits provides participants a rare opportunity to discover the little known about gems of sites and buildings hidden behind locked gates and no trespassing signs. The three sites that visits are being organised to are:

  1. 8 April 2018: The former Kinloss House at Lady Hill Road ,
  2. 15 April 2018: Old Kallang Airport, and
  3. 22 April 2018: The former Pasir Panjang ‘A’ Power Station 

Information on the visits for the Singapore Heritage Festival are available on the links above. Spaces are limited and registration is necessary via Peatix on 28 March 2018 (a link to the registration site can also be found below – already live as of 11 am 28 March 2018).

Registration links:

  1. Registration for Kinloss House at Lady Hill Road ,
  2. Registration for Old Kallang Airport, and
  3. Registration for Pasir Panjang ‘A’ Power Station

The former Pasir Panjang ‘A’ Power Station – a red brick gem of a building.

More information on the sites can be found at the following links:

Inside the former Kinloss House.

Photographs:

The Streamline Moderne Terminal Building of the former Kallang Airport.





A journey through Tanjong Pagar in 1970

23 02 2018

There is always and element of romance connected with train journeys, especially the leisurely paced journeys of the past with which one can take in the magical scenes along the way that one can only get from railway journeys. LIFE Magazine’s Carl Mydans, a legendary photograph whose work spans several decades and includes an extensive coverage of Singapore prior to the war (see “A glimpse of Singapore in 1941, the year before the darkness fell“), took one such journey out of an independent Singapore some 3 decades later, capturing a Singapore we can no longer see but through photographs of the era. The set, also includes scenes along the journey to Bangkok, along with those captured at stopovers made in West Malaysia’s main urban centres.

The photographs of Singapore are particularly interesting. There are some of the old harbour, and quite a few of the twakow decorated Singapore River along which much of Singapore’s trade passed through. There are also several street scenes, once familiar to us in the area of North Bridge Road. A couple of quite rare shots were also taken at Tanjong Pagar Railway Station including one showing a steam locomotive of a 1940s vintage, which the Malayan Railway operated until the early 1970s. There are also images of the steam locos captured during the journey.

The photographs of West Malaysia are also interesting. The replacement of rubber trees with oil palm as a crop, which had been taking place in parts of the peninsula from the 1960s to reduce Malaysia’s reliance on rubber and tin was in evidence. This is something that I well remember from the road trips to Malaysia of my early childhood. Another familiar scene from those trips were of the padi fields, which the trunk road passing through Malacca seemed to weave through. This is something Mr. Mydans also seemed to have captured quite a fair bit of.

The departure platform at Tanjong Pagar Railway Station with a prewar relic of a steam locomotive.

Malaysian Customs Inspection at the Departure Platform.

The Supreme Court and the Padang.

Hock Lam Street.

Corner of Hock Lam Street and North Bridge Road.

North Bridge Road.


The old harbour (Marina Bay today)

View of Clifford Pier and the Inner Road, and Outer Roads beyond the Detached Mole. The view today would be towards Marina Bay Sands and Marina South.

Another view of the harbour – where Marina Bay Sands and Marina South is today. The Harbour Division of the Preventive Branch of the Department of Customs and Excise (Customs House today) can be seen at the lower right hand corner.

A rainbow over the harbour.


Boat Quay and the Singapore River

Walking the plank. Coolies loaded and unloaded twakows by balancing items that were often bulkier than their tiny frames over narrow and rather flimsy planks that connected the boats to the quayside.

A view of the stepped sides of the river around where Central is today.

Boat Quay.

Coolies sliding crates that were too bulky and heavy along the plank.

Lorry cranes were sometimes used instead.

But more often than not manual labour was used.

A view of the “belly of the carp”.


The Journey North

(with stops in Malacca, Kuala Lumpur, Penang and Bangkok)

A steam locomotive at what looks like Gemas Railway Station.

More steam locomotives (at Gemas?).

Inside the train cabin.

Train along a shunt line.

Rubber estates and rubber tappers were a common sight – even along the roads up north.

So were water buffaloes and padi fields.

Padi field.

Another view of a padi field.

Oil palms taking root. A drive to reduce Malaysia’s dependence on rubber and tin from the 1960s would see oil palms colour a landscape once dominated by rubber trees.

Another cabin view.

A break in the journey – a view of the Stadthuys Malacca.

Jalan Kota in Malacca.

View of the Malacca River.

The Arthur Benison Hubback designed (old) KL Railway Station .

Another view of the south end of the KL Railway Station – with a view also of the KL Railway Administration Building.

A southward view down Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin (ex Victory Avenue) with the KL Railway Station on the left and the KL Railway Administration Building on the right, also designed by Arthur Bennison Hubback.

The Railway Administration Building and Masjid Negara.

A view down Jalan Raja in KL with the BagunanSultan Abdul Samad on the left.

Another view down Jalan Raja in KL with the BagunanSultan Abdul Samad on the left and Dataran Merdeka on the right.

Sungai Siput Railway Station.

The Penang Ferry from Butterworth.

A view of Butterworth.

George Town – with a view towards the clan jetties.

The Kek Lok Si Temple in Penang.

Air Itam and the Kek Lok Si Temple in Penang.

What looks like the Leong San Tong in the Khoo Kongsi in George Town.

The Penang Hill funicular railway.

More padi fields.

Possibly southern Thailand.

Bangkok.








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