The hunt for eggs this Easter

16 04 2017

The hunt for eggs this Easter should start at the Singapore Philatelic Museum. The museum, despite its name, is not just about stamps but has quite an interesting mix of exhibitions that will delight the visitor and to celebrate Easter, as well as the arrival of Spring and also the (Chinese) year of the rooster, the museum has brought in 148 eggs flown in from one of Europe’s smallest countries, Lichtenstein.

A silver egg with an image of St. George and the Dragon (the patron saint of Russia and Moscow).

A perforated chicken egg with a decorated egg yolk.

Like the museum, Lichtenstein despite its tiny size, has quite a surprise in store. The eggs, which are quite extraordinary, are part of a precious collection from the vaults of the Lichtenstein National Museum that will be seen for the first time outside of Europe. Drawn from the Adulf Peter Goop collection, the eggs are a mix of finely decorated quail, ostrich, goose, duck, swan and chicken eggs, as well as ones made from precious metals, glass, porcelain, wax, crystal, marble, stone, wood , reindeer horn, cardboard and papier-mâché. The exhibition, “Precious Eggs: Of Art, Beauty and Culture”, also sees commissioned egg sculptures created by Liechtenstein’s leading artists, including Dr George Malin, Arno Oehri and Sunhild Wollwage on display. It will run until 8 October 2017.

Goose egg – with the Madonna and Child made with paper and dried flowers.

Egg mail!

In conjunction with the exhibition and specially for Easter Sunday, the museum will hold a series of activities for kids and the family. One that is particularly interesting, the Pysanka Egg Demonstration, takes place from 1 to 4 pm. Lovely ladies from the 300 strong Ukrainian community in Singapore will be on hand to show how Pysanka – traditional Ukrainian Easter eggs – are decorated. The unique decorations, include geometric patterns from the mountainous areas of the country and also other motifs that are typical of the cities and visitors will not only get to learn about Ukraine’s unique Easter celebrations, they will also get to try their hand at decorating the eggs. Other activities include a “Green Eggs and Ham” storytelling session, Easter Craft and a fun quiz.

Ladies from the Ukrainian community will demonstrate ‘pysanka’ .

Pysanka – traditional Ukrainian decorated Easter eggs.


The Adulf Peter Goop Collection:

Born in Liechtenstein, Mr Adulf Peter Goop (1921-2011) started to collect Easter eggs in 1985. He was inspired by his experiences as a boy giving painted eggs on Easter morning to Russian soldiers seeking asylum at the end of World War II, who were touched by the gesture of friendship. Numbering about 4,000 eggs, his impressive collection hails from all over the world – some from the Russian Imperial Family. In 2010, Mr Goop donated his comprehensive art collection to the Principality of Liechtenstein.


 





In search of love in the old GPO

14 04 2017

I loved the old GPO. It was a post office like none other in Singapore. Its main hall, which you entered after a climb up a short flight of stairs, was grand and airy. Stretching almost the entire length of the building, the hall was also where the long postal counter was found. That ran along the hall’s length and held the distinction of being the longest in the world.  Like all old buildings, the GPO – now the Fullerton Hotel has its collection of stories, including ones that tell of romantic liaisons.

In search of romance – a civil servant, played by Isabelle Chiam, gets everyone at the Minsitry of Finance involved.

An opportunity to discover the romances of the past, and also the building’s colourful history – in a fun and amusing way – presents itself with “A Fullerton Love Story Tour”.  Led by a resident tour guide, participants are taken on a search for romance – not of their own – but between a love struck postman at the GPO, played by Edward Choy, and his love interest – a civil servant with the Ministry of Finance housed in the same building – played by Isabelle Chiam. Participants also become part of the story as they move through various historic spots that include the Singapore Club, Fullerton Square, the Presidential Suite and the location of the Fullerton Building’s former lighthouse.

The love struck postman, played by Edward Choy.

View from the lighthouse towards what used to be the harbour.

Tours, which will be held from 8pm to 9.30 pm on 29 April, 6 May and 13 May 2017, are available for booking at http://afullertonlovestorytour.peatix.com. Priced at $78 nett for adults and $58 nett for children between 6 to 11, the tours will be followed by desserts at The Courtyard crafted by Executive Pastry Chef, Enrico Pezzelato.

The resident tour guide.

Besides the tour, which is being held in conjunction with the Singapore Heritage Festival 2017, the Fullerton Hotel is also bring back the TENG Ensemble for a showcase of brand new Singapore-inspired works. The showcase, “Where the River Always Flows II”, will include songs by P. Ramlee and Zubir Said and two East-West pieces specially commissioned  by the Fullerton Heritage.  Tickets for the concert, which will be held at the East Garden on 29 April 2017 at 7 pm, are available at $3 each at http://wheretheriveralwaysflows2.peatix.com.  More information on the concert and the tour can be found at the Fullerton Heritage’s website.

Enchanted Garden – one of five desserts guests on the tour will get to choose from.





Back to school at Armenian Street

10 03 2017

Detention class, tuck shop, science lab, literature class and PE – names that evoke an instant recall of the best (or worst) days of our lives – will haunt Armenian Street this weekend when just like the good old days, scores of kids dressed in school uniforms that probably no longer fit, make a return to the area for the Armenian Street Party.

The former Tao Nan School – now Peranakan Museum, in party colours.

Put together by the Peranakan Museum, which is itself housed in a former school building,  the party being held this Friday and Saturday evening, offers lots of opportunities, especially for those of my generation, to feel that youthful vibe of one’s schooldays. If being naughty and ending up in The Substation’s Detention (an interactive space that celebrates creativity and playfulness) isn’t for you, there are lots of other things to do including showcasing one’s talents on stage through the Timbre Group’s Open Mic Night to relive the glitzy days of Talentime, tucking into some delectable and quite un-school canteen like treats brought the Tuckshop by True Blue Cuisine, and take part in Upside Motion’s Xtend the Night PE lessons – for which sign-ups ( are required at http://asp-xtendthenight-80s.peatix.com/ (Fri) and http://asp-xtendthenight-90s.peatix.com/ (Sat).

More information on the party and how to have fun at it can be found at the Peranakan Museum‘s and Singapore Philatelic Museum‘s websites.

Detention Class by The Substation (Friday and Saturday, 10 and 11 March 2017 7.30pm – 11pm).

Glee Club by Sing’theatre Academy (Friday, 10 March 2017 6.45pm, 7.45pm and 8.45pm).

Old School Swinging by Act 3 International (Friday, 10 March 2017, at 6pm and Saturday, 11 March 2017, at 6pm and 8pm).

 





What’s crowing this Chinese New Year

6 01 2017

The highly anticipated annual Chinatown Street Light-up will be launched on Saturday 7 January 2016, kicking-off a seven-week long celebration in the precinct aimed at ushering in and celebrating the Chinese Year of the Rooster. This year’s light-up features the largest number of lanterns made for a Chinatown celebration – some 5,500 in all – including a centrepiece giant rooster that crows across the road on the divider between Eu Tong Sen Street and New Bridge Road at the streets’  meeting with Upper Cross Street.

The 13 metre tall rooster lantern with a 100 metre long tail.

The 13 metre tall rooster lantern with long tail feathers that crows every now and then.

Designed by students from the SUTD, the LED lit lanterns along the centre divider illustrate the stages in the life of the rooster and impart life’s values through the 55 roosters, 64 hens, 134 chicks and 56 golden eggs on display. In addition to this there are also 1000 peony flower lanterns along New Bridge Road and Eu Tong Sen Street and 4,100 peach blossom lanterns, 21 peach blossom trees and 90 lanterns along South Bridge Road. The crowing rooster, the centrepiece, measures 13 metres tall, 7 metres wide and with the inclusion of its tail feathers, 100 metres in length.

Lessons from the life of the rooster - on the centre divider between Eu Tong Sen Street and New Bridge Road.

Lessons from the life of the rooster – along the centre divider between Eu Tong Sen Street and New Bridge Road.

Peonies over New Bridge Road.

Peonies over New Bridge Road.

Peach Blossoms over South Bridge Road.

Peach Blossoms over South Bridge Road.

In addition to the light-up, the Chinatown Chinese New Year Celebrations also feature the popular annual street bazaar, which will run from 6 to 27 January 2017. The bazaar will feature some 440 stalls, which will line Pagoda, Smith, Sago Temple and Trengganu Streets, offering festive goodies and decorations among other items and brings great atmosphere to the streets of Chinatown.

The giant rooster - seen at street level.

The giant rooster – seen at street level.

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Chickens, chickens everywhere.

There is also a youthful theme being introduced to this year’s event with YouthEats @ Temple Street and YHFlea: Come Lepark edition. YouthEats will see 12 entrepreneurs with unique food offerings, while YHFlea, being held on 14 and 15 January, is a flea market that will feature 100 local brands and independent designer. Other activities to look out for are Walking Trails being held on 8, 14, 15, 21 and 22 January at 3.30 to 5.00 pm for which pre-registration is required at www.chinatownfestivals.sg, the Official Light-up and Opening Ceremony on 7 January, Nightly Stage Shows, the International Lion Dance Competition – for which more information can be found at http://chinatownfestivals.sg/chinatown-chinese-new-year-celebrations-2017/.





The William Farquhar collection comes alive

7 12 2016

Two years in the making, Story of the Forest – an interactive digital installation that brings 69 drawings of the William Farquhar Collection of Natural History Drawings alive, makes it public debut on Saturday 10 December 2016. The work was commissioned as part of the revamp of the permanent galleries of the National Museum of Singapore for the Glass Rotunda. The scale and curvature of the venue presented huge challenges to the Japanese digital art collective behind it, teamLab and required team of 30 to be assembled. Much of the task, including pre-production, was carried out at teamLab’s base in Japan and this included the construction of a full scale mockup. A large enough warehouse – there apparently was the only one in Tokyo that the mock-up could fit into – was used for the mockup.

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Story of the Forest, by teamLab.

Cascading flowers of Story of the Forest's first segment.

Cascading flowers of Story of the Forest’s first segment.

The interactive second segment that takes visitors down a 170m walkway to the lower rotunda.

The interactive second segment that takes visitors down a 170m walkway to the lower rotunda.

More of the second segment.

More of the second segment.

Deeply inspired by the set of drawings on which the installation draws on for its images, teamLab’s has come up with one of the most amazing of installations that takes visitors on a journey of rediscovery through the rich assembly of flora and fauna that the Farquhar collection so beautifully captures. The Glass Rotunda, an architectural response of the Neo-Palladian rotunda of the museum’s main building, is a huge space to fill. It has a 15 metre high ceiling and a spiral walkway that requires the installation to be stretched across some 170 metres. teamLab response to this is a three segment installation. Cascading flora greets the visitors at the entrance, before the journey begins down the walkway with animals serving as a guide. A mobile app is available to enhance this experience. The app allows the “capture” of animals through the phone’s camera. The climax of the installation is a very dynamic one that takes place at the lower rotunda. Running animals, blooming trees, shooting stars and falling fruits make the experience especially immersive.

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The lower rotunda is also where a second installation can be viewed – that of Robert Zhao’s Singapore, Very Old Tree. 17 photographs of the 30 photographs in the collection are one display. The photographs explore the nation’s identity and uncovers the personal relationships between people and trees.

Singapore, A Very Old Tree.

Singapore, A Very Old Tree.

Admission to the Glass Rotunda (and Permanent Galleries) will be free to all visitors during the opening weekend on 10 and 11 December 2016 (it is also free on a permanent basis for Singaporeans and PRs). A host of activities for the family is also being lined up, more information on which can be found at www.nationalmuseum.sg.

A Patek Phillippe 'Farquhar Collection' Dome table clock donated by Hour Glass. Proceeds from an auction have gone to the revamp of the Glass Rotunda.

A Patek Phillippe ‘Farquhar Collection’ Dome table clock donated by Hour Glass. Proceeds from an auction have gone to the revamp of the Glass Rotunda.

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Second Nature, an interactive and immersive “secret garden” exhibit that features elements from the William Farquhar Collection of Natural History Drawings and reacts to your movements! Visitors are encouraged to participate and engage with the exhibit, as well as contribute to the installation by folding origami flowers and attaching them to a flowering board

Wings

Wings of a Rich Manoeuvre. A permanent installation by Suzann Victor for Swarovski, which was unveiled on 30 Nov 2016.

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In Singapore: The amazing human tower builders of Catalonia

20 10 2016

A Catalonian tradition that dates back to the 1700s, a human tower or castell building performance is being seen for the first time in Southeast in Asia. One of the many rich and interesting cultural practices of Spain as a whole, and of Catalonia, the tradition – usually performed on important festivals, is inscribed in the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The Minyons de Terrassa at Kidzania, Sentosa.

Close to 300 castellers from the Minyons de Terrassa are in Singapore, brought in by Qatar Airways and the Catalonia Tourism Board. The group has recently broken the world record for the biggest human tower ever built.

Practice makes perfect.

Practice makes perfect.

The building of castells involve a huge group forming the all important base on top of which tiers of more castellers are progressively built up, supported by the shoulders of those in the tiers below. The bigger built of the castellers form the lower tiers with brave young children climbing higher up to form the summit.

Forming the base.

Forming the base.

Forming the lower tier.

The Minyons de Terrassa, who have performed at Raffles Place on 19 October and at Kidzania in Sentosa today, will hold two more performances tomorrow, 21 October 2016, at 4.30 pm for ITB Asia at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Centre and again at 5.30 pm at Customs House. On another note, Qatar Airways, flies from Singapore to Barcelona (and Madrid) via Doha’s Hamad International Airport. The airlines is offering special fares, which start from SGD 945, until 24 October 2016 for travel until 30 June 2017.

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Ancient music in Jackie Chan’s ancient houses

20 10 2016

A most delightful gift to Singapore made by Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan is the set of four structures that now grace the campus of the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) at Somapah. Dating back to the Ming and Qing dynasties, the structures were originally from Zhejiang province in China. A chance to have a look at them came with a Nanyin performance by the Siong Leng Musical Association held in the structures that I was invited to recently.

Ancient music in ancient structures. A performance by the Siong Leng Musical Association held in a main hall that was part of a house from Zhejiang.

Ancient music in ancient structures. A performance by the Siong Leng Musical Association held in a main hall that was part of a house from Zhejiang.

Part of a collection of ten ancient structures purchased by martial arts star with the intention that they be dismantled and re-erected as a home for his parents, the structures were put in storage for much longer than was intended. Little was documented on the assembly of the structures, which proved a challenge when the university looked at reassembling them.

The pavilion.

The pavilion.

The structures feature some rather interesting and previously unseen features in Singapore in which many Chinese structures are of the Minnan style. An examples of this is the exquisitely carved oversized wooden corbels seen in one of the structures, a late Qing dynasty pavilion. The pavilion, interestingly, also features a mix of styles seen in the wooden balustrades with a Suzhou flavour.

The Suzhou style is also seen in some of the features of the pavilion.

The Suzhou style is also seen in some of the features of the pavilion.

Close to the pavilion, another of the structures – an opera stage, has an interesting feature on its ceiling – a dome of sorts that acts to enhance the stage acoustics.

A feature on the ceiling of the opera stage that enhances the stage's acoustics.

A feature on the ceiling of the opera stage that enhances the stage’s acoustics.

Hokkien opera on an ancient opera stage.

Hokkien opera on an ancient opera stage.

A close-up.

A close-up.

There are also two structures, complementing parts of a Ming dynasty house and a Qing dynasty house, that have been put together in the setting of a lake. Featuring a mix of old and new in the glass panels that keep the air-conditioning in, the parts which have only a small difference in width, find harmony even if they were from different houses and from different times. The parts are a main hall and an inner hall where bedrooms would have been located. An interesting contrast between the two are the finished wooden columns seen in the main hall where guests would be entertained and the coarser looking (and less costly) unfinished columns in the inner more private area.

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In the inner hall.

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The two parts of two houses, complementing each other in the setting of a lake.

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The opera stage by night.

A carved corbel on the stage.

A carved corbel on the stage.

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