The Singapore Garden Festival 2016

28 07 2016

The sixth edition of the Singapore Garden Festival is back! Running from from 23 – 31 July 2016 at the Gardens by the Bay, this year’s event covering an area of some 9.7 hectares, is the largest ever. The highlight of the festival is probably at The Meadow. Here visitors will be treated to eye-catching creations by some of the world’s gardening greats including the nine Landscape Show Gardens, six Fantasy Show Gardens, fourteen Floral Windows to the World and five Balcony Gardens – all of which are crowd favourites.

My favourite landscape show garden - The Treasure Box by Inch Lim of Malaysia.

My favourite landscape show garden – The Treasure Box by Inch Lim of Malaysia.

Modern Day Maui - a Fantasy Show Garden by Adam Shuter of New Zealand.

Modern Day Maui – a Fantasy Show Garden by Adam Shuter of New Zealand.

Another favourite will have to be the burst of colours in the Flower Dome provided by the Orchid Extravaganza. On display are a rich heritage of orchids that will provide an appreciation of what the world’s most diverse botanical family has to offer.

An award winning Rawdon Jester 'Great Bee' at the Orchid Extravaganza at the Flower Dome.

An award winning Rawdon Jester ‘Great Bee’ at the Orchid Extravaganza at the Flower Dome.

More unusual orchids.

More unusual orchids.

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A host of other displays and activities are also lined up for the festival including a Learning Garden, a Landscape Design Challenge featuring teams of students, the World Of Terrariums which sees more than 100 creative displays of terrariums put up by students, hobbyists and community gardeners. There is also a Vibrant Marketplace in the non-ticketed area to look out for. This sees over 100 booths offering both sustenance and items such as plants, gardening and landscape products and services, and arts and crafts.

A pineapple plant, one of the many useful plants - kitchen-wise at the Learning Garden.

A pineapple plant, one of the many useful plants – kitchen-wise at the Learning Garden.

The festival also features a photo and an Instagram contest.  The “Tropical Floral Wonderland” Photography Contest offers prizes such as a Nikon D750 kit set, Nikon D7200 (18 – 105mm) kit set and Nikon D5500 (18 – 55mm) kit set. To enter, photos should be submitted by email to sggardenfest@gmail.com by 1 August 2016. For mobile phone photographers, uploading a photo to Instagram with the hashtag #sggardenfest (post has to be set as public) or via the contest page on the SGF Facebook page during the Festival period, will qualify entrants for a chance to win Nikon COOLPIX S7000 cameras.

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The festival runs until Sunday. More information, including ticketing can be found at the Singapore Garden Festival website.


More photographs from the festival:

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More Fantasy Gardens – Mystical Depths by Hugo Bugg of the UK.

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A Garden in a Flower, a Fantasy Garden by Michael Petrie of the US.

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Dare to Dream, a Fantasy Garden by John Tan and Raymond Toh of Singapore.

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Another crowd favourite – Nature’s Resolution, a Fantasy Garden by Stefano Passerotti of Italy.

Power of the Earth, a Fantasy Garden by Katsuhiko Koga and Kazuhiro Kagae of Japan.

Power of the Earth, a Fantasy Garden by Katsuhiko Koga and Kazuhiro Kagae of Japan.

Another view of Modern Day Maui.

Another view of Modern Day Maui.

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The Sugarcane Maze – a Landscape Garden by Kong Jian Yu of China.

The Sugarcane Maze - a Landscape Garden by Kong Jian Yu of China.

Another view of the Sugarcane Maze – a Landscape Garden by Kong Jian Yu of China.

Back to Nature - a Landscape garden by a South African / New Zealand team.

Back to Nature – a Landscape garden by a South African / New Zealand team.

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Benny’s Sunflower Farm.

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Gary’s Musical Flower Field.

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Another view of Gary’s Musical Flower Field.

Winter Wonderland.

Winter Wonderland.

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A Balcony Garden.

Galaxy Floristic - Floral Windows into the World.

Galaxy Floristic – Floral Windows into the World.

Another Floral Windows into the World display.

Another Floral Windows into the World display.

A Celebration Floral Table.

A Celebration Floral Table.


More photographs from the Orchid Extravaganza:
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A secret garden

30 05 2013

One of the wonderful things about Macau is its little pockets of surprises which await discovery in the midst of the urban sprawl. One seemingly unlikely place that I was to find on a recent trip is one which in being well hidden behind its walls must surely have once been a secret garden. The garden, landscaped in the classical Suzhou style and now public garden, the Lou Lim Ieoc Garden (Jardim Lou Lim Ieoc / 盧廉若公園), was built as a private garden.

A secret garden in Macau where touch of Suzhou in a colonial style house can be found.

A secret garden in Macau where touch of Suzhou in a colonial style house can be found.

A lady practicing tai-chi chuan at the garden.

A lady practicing tai-chi chuan in the garden.

The garden with its winding paths, some leading to spaces hidden behind artificial concrete “rock” formations and weeping willows, provides an escape for many residents of the overly crowded city. Constructed around a large pond with the colonial style column lined Spring Grass Pavilion which served as a guest residence at one edge, it does perhaps reflect one of the quirky sides of what was an enclave in China which for long was caught in between the West and the East.

The Spring Grass Pavilion across the pond.

The Spring Grass Pavilion across the pond.

A bridge of twists and turns takes one across the northern end of the pond. The bridge, a nine-turn bridge laid out such that evil spirits, which as belief would have it, can only navigate on the straight; leads to an area at the northern fringe of the garden at which an imposing pastel green coloured building can be seen beyond the fence – that, which became the Pui Ching Middle School in 1938,  apparently was the mansion that the garden was built to serve and the residence of a wealthy merchant Lou Wah Siu.

The nine-turn bridge with the former mansion, now part of Pui Ching Middle School, beyond it.

The nine-turn bridge with the former mansion, now part of Pui Ching Middle School, beyond it.

Based on information found at the Macau Cultural Institute’s website, the garden’s construction was started by Mr Lou, who purchased the land on which the mansion and the garden was built on – a plot of vegetables in what then was Long Tin Village, in 1870. Mr Lou also started with the building of the garden which was later completed by his son Lou Lim Ieoc, after who the garden is now named. The garden’s most notable visitor was the great Chinese revolutionary Sun Yat-sen. Dr Sun was a guest at the Spring Grass Pavilion in May 1912.

A pavilion at the edge of the pond - the garden is an oasis of tranquility in a sea of concrete.

A pavilion at the edge of the pond – the garden is an oasis of tranquility in a sea of concrete.

The back part of the Spring Grass Pavilion - with Chinese  architectural features. The former guest house - now used as an exhibition space, played host to Dr Sun Yat-sen in 1912.

The back part of the Spring Grass Pavilion – with Chinese architectural features. The former guest house – now used as an exhibition space, played host to Dr Sun Yat-sen in 1912.

The grounds were split up and sold to separate buyers after the junior Lou’s passing, the mansion passing into the hands of the school. By the time the administration in Macau bought the southern side of the garden which wasn’t owned by the school in the early 1970s, it was in a poorly maintained state. It took some restoration effort before it was opened as a public garden in 1974. The garden has today become a popular spot for many of the area’s residents and comes alive in the early part of the morning. Taking a stroll, one sees many using it for their daily exercise, to meditate, read the newspaper or a book, or to practice tai-chi moves which does make it an excellent place to take in a slice of daily life in the former Portuguese colony as well as provide many opportunities for photography.  The Lou Lim Ieoc Garden is found off Estrada de Adolfo Loureiro and is close to Praça do Tap Seac and the beautiful St. Lazarus area. Opening hours are from 6 am to 9 pm.

The inner entrance arch to the garden off Estrada de Adolfo Loureiro.

The inner entrance arch to the garden off Estrada de Adolfo Loureiro.

The garden is particularly busy in the mornings - many of the area's residents use it for their daily exercise.

The garden is particularly busy in the mornings – many of the area’s residents use it for their daily exercise.

Migrant workers seen taking in the calm at one of the gardens pavilions.

Migrant workers seen taking in the calm at one of the gardens pavilions.