A picture postcard fishing port – Castro Urdiales

9 07 2012

Headed west on a road journey that started in the Basque city of Bilbao, my three travel companions and I would probably have not thought of making a detour to the Cantabrian fishing port of Castro Urdiales just 35 kilometres into the drive, if not for a sign which seemed to urge us to make that detour. What we would have missed out if we hadn’t was the picture postcard view we were treated to of the port’s harbour against the backdrop to its medieval monuments atop a high point on a promontory that forms one end of the harbour.

The picture postcard view of the harbour of Castro Urdiales and the Puebla Vieja with its medieval church and castle sitting on a promontory across the harbour.

The monuments, part of the Puebla Vieja, the old town, are the remnants of a medieval world that had once existed where a more modern world has taken over. The monuments inlcude the Gothic style Iglesia de Santa María de la Asunción; the Castillo de Santa Ana, a castle; and the Puente de Castro Urdiales, a very high single span bridge with a pointed arch. All of these along with the harbour decorated with the colours of the boats it shelters and the houses that line the quayside paints a charming and very picturesque scene.

Another view across the harbour towards the promontory and the medieval church and castle.

The church a fine example of the Cantabrian Gothic style which shows French influence built from the 13th to 15th Centuries stands next to the ruins of a Romanesque church, the Iglesia de San Pedro. Among the artifacts that are housed in the church is a tall stone sculpture depicting Mary with the infant Jesus – Santa María con el Niño that dates to the thirteenth century.

The church, la Iglesia de Santa María de la Asunción, dates back to the 13th to 15th centuries.

The church is built in the Gothic style and show French Gothic influence.

Flying buttresses typical of Gothic style churches.

A polychrome stone sculpture of Santa María con el Niño (Mary with the infant Jesus) dating from the thirteenth century that is housed in the church.

A view of Santa María de la Asunción through the ruins of an 11th Century church, Iglesia de San Pedro.

The castle, Castillo de Santa Ana seen together with the ruins of Iglesia de San Pedro.

A view of the new part of town from the Puebla Vieja.

A view towards the breakwater from the promontory.

The medieval castle stands on the highest point of the promontory overlooking the sea.

The medieval bridge, the Puente de Castro-Urdiales. The lighthouse built on the castle can be seen atop the castle.

It is from the promontory where one gets a magnificent reverse view of the harbour – and the new town beyond it, a view that is no less beautiful than the view one gets of promontory from across the harbour and the four of us could have spent an entire day and not find the town short of views to photograph. Glad that we had made the detour, we probably spent a little more time than we had allowed ourselves, reluctantly leaving after spending a good three hours in all … three hours that were certainly very well spent.

The 18th century Neo Classical Town Hall, Casa Consistorial.

The cafe culture is very much alive in a fishing town that has become a tourist destination.

A house along the quayside.

A view of the harbour.

A close-up of a building along the quayside.





75 feet above the harbour

30 03 2012

From a vantage point 75 feet (about 23 metres) over Singapore’s former harbour, officers with the Harbour Division of the Preventive Branch of the Department of Customs and Excise (which later became Singapore Customs), stood watch over the Inner Roads of the harbour for more than three decades. The vantage point, a panoramic lookout tower that we still today, was part of the Customs Harbour Branch Building built over an L-shaped pier along the waterfront at the end of Collyer Quay. The building and pier, built at a cost of S$1.8 million, was completed in October 1969. The complex housed the 300 strong force of the then Harbour Division, as well as provided berths and maintenance facilities (which included a slipway) for some 35 launches and speedboats of the Division when it first opened. The building also provided cargo examination facilities and its construction allowed the Division to move from its somewhat makeshift premises in a godown in Telok Ayer Basin.

What is today a posh dining destination, Customs House, with its very distinct 75 foot lookout tower, was formerly the Customs Harbour Branch Building. It was completed in October 1969 and housed the Harbour Division of the Customs Preventive Branch.

The Customs Harbour Branch Building in 2006 (source: URA site on Conservation Matters).

Collyer Quay in July 1974 seen beyond the Detached Mole, a breakwater that sheltered the Inner Roads from the opened Outer Roads. The Customs Harbour Branch Building and its distinct 75 foot tower is seen on the extreme left of the photograph (Photo courtesy of Peter Chan).

While 75 feet in the context of what now surrounds the former Customs complex, the tower allowed customs officers to keep a round-the-clock watch over the harbour for small boats attempting to sneak dutiable goods into Singapore. The octagonal shaped and fully air-conditioned watch tower which is supported by a cylindrical base provided a panoramic view which extended beyond the Inner Roads to the mouth of the Singapore River, the Geylang River and Tanjong Rhu. Officers spotting a suspicious boat could then alert their colleagues manning the speedboats which were on standby by the pier who would then head out to intercept the suspicious boat.

A side elevation of the former Customs Harbour Branch Building with its very distinct lookout tower (source: URA site on Conservation Matters).

At the bottom of the 75 feet climb up a spiral staircase to the lookout tower - reminiscent of climbs up several lighthouses I've visited.

In between heavy panting, I managed to appreciate the view halfway up.

At the end of the 75 feet climb - a view of the lookout tower's ceiling.

Looking down at the cause of my heavy breathing.

Use for the building and the pier in its intended role ended with the construction of the Marina Barrage which cut what were the Inner Roads of the old harbour off from the sea and the building then under the Maritime and Port Authority’s charge was passed over to the Singapore Land Authority in 2006. Customs House was given conservation status in 2007 and was reopened as a dining destination under the management of Fullerton Heritage, which also manages the former Clifford Pier and the Fullerton Hotel. The tower itself is however disused and remains inaccessible to the general public.

At the top of the lookout tower.

The lookout tower no longer commands a view of a harbour littered with bumboats, twakows and tongkangs, but of the new world that is Marina Bay.

Show me the money! An interpretation perhaps of the new view - as seen in the reflection of a window of the lookout tower offered by one of the installations for i Light Marina Bay 2012 - Teddy Lo's MEGAPOV.

Seeing double - BIBI's Bibigloo and a reflection of it as viewed from the lookout tower.








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