A labyrinth of food and much more

15 10 2012

Besides Coloane Village, another place in Macau that I would surely find many happy moments exploring in is Taipa Village. In the shadow of the new at the not so far away Cotai Strip, and closer to Macau Peninsula, the village is on the island of the same name. In it is not only that meeting of east and west to discover, but also several well preserved colonial era buildings centered on the Avenida da Praia and also at Carmel Square. It is also a world where one can lose oneself, wandering the streets and finding little bits of not just the old world, but also some rather delectable treats – one famous one being the famed Tai Lei Loi Kei Pork Chop Bun, to indulge oneself in. Although not comprehensive, the following are seven things that one must do to discover that bit of old Macau in Taipa:

Taipa Village as seen off the reflection of a convex traffic mirror.

The new world of the Cotai Strip looms over old Taipa.

The streets of Taipa offer a fascinating insight into life in older Macau.

As the group of bloggers were to discover.


Old World Discoveries

Taipa is rich in the old world, including several well preserved buildings from the colonial era centered in the Praia area. On the heights above the Praia is a delightful little square with some excellent examples of public and religious architecture including Taipa Library and the Church of Our Lady of Carmel. Below this on the Avenida da Praia, there are also a row of five very pretty houses from the colonial period – beautifully preserved as the Taipa Houses-Museum. In each house, visitors are offered a look back in time into the colonial life with the first furnished much as it would have been during the colonial era, as well as Portuguese traditions, and into traditional industries.

(1) Carmel Square

Taipa Library at Carmel Square (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Church of Our Lady of Carmel, Carmel Square built in 1885 (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).


(2) Avenida da Praia and the Taipa Houses Museum

The Taipa Houses Museum, a row of 5 colonial heritage houses along the Avenida da Praia (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Ai Sakura at the Avenida da Praia.

Taipa Houses Museum.

The Taipa Houses Museum offers a peek into an old world.

A child’s toy at the Taipa Houses Museum.

Admission to Taipa-Houses Museum (Closed on Mondays):
MOP/HKD5 per adult
FREE for visitors under 12 yrs old and above 65 years old
FREE admission on every Tuesdays.


Food Glorious Food

Taipa is also well known for its food and snacks with a host of well established eating places that offer Cantonese, Macanese and Portuguese cuisine including the O Manuel Portuguese Restaurant. There are also several food discoveries to be made, and besides the famous Pork Chop Bun there is also the famous Taipa Food Street,Rua do Cunha, lined with confectioneries and snack shops to discover, and not to forget, another must try are the Birds Nest Egg Tarts from San Hou Lei a little eatery on the Rua do Regedor.

(3) Rua do Cunha (Taipa Food Street)

The writing on the wall of a confectionery at one end of the famous Taipa Food Street (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Almond cookies in the works at Taipa Food Street (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Valyn seen along the Food Street.

More Almond Cookies!

The Food Street offers lots of snacks to satisfy any craving!

Taipa Food Street (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).


(4) San Hou Lei – Bird’s Nest Egg Tarts

Bird’s Nest Egg Tarts!


(5) O Manuel Portuguese Restaurant

Sardine at O Manuel Portuguese Restaurant.

And lots of meat!

(6) Tai Lei Loi Kei Pork Chop Bun


Object of desire … can’t leave Taipa without sinking one’s mouth into one of these! The famous Tai Lei Loi Kei Pork Chop Bun.

Tai Lei Loi Kei in Taipa.


Roaming the Streets

One thing that I would certainly do when I do return to Macau is to roam the streets of Taipa (as well as Coloane and the area around Senado Square) just to get lost and find what Macau is truly all about. On the evidence of that little bit of time when I did actually get lost as the group walked ahead while I waited for Chun See who had paid a visit to the gents was that there was a wonderful labyrinth of lanes and alleyways – each with a unique charm and certainly one to discover and to photograph.

(7) Getting lost

The streets of Taipa make it a wonderful place to roam around …

… and get lost in …

Street scene.

The streets offer lots of little discoveries.

There’s lots of colour ….

The streets also offer a peek into life in the old world ….

… through its labyrinth of alleyways.

Village street (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

A shady tree lined road in Taipa Village (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Street sign.

Street scene.

Another street scene.

More street scenes …. (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Houses (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

More houses (leading up to Taipa Food Street) (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

A shuttered shop.

A sidewalk in Taipa.


The trip was made possible by the kind sponsorship of the Macau Government Tourist Office (MGTO) which included a three night stay at the Grand Lapa Macau, and also Tiger Airways who sponsored the two way flights.


Links to discovering Taipa:

Macau Government Tourist Office
Tiger Airways
Taipa
Museums (including Taipa Houses-Museum
Taipa Food Street on Wikipedia
O Manuel Portuguese Restaurant on HK Magazine
San Hou Lei on Macau24.com
Tai Lei Loi Kei on metropolasia.com


Note: this is a repost of my post on the omy.sg My Macau Experience 2012 site which sees 10 bloggers share experiences of their visit to Macau. Readers will get a chance to vote for their favourite My Macau Experience 2012 blogger and stand a chance to win $1000 worth of Macau travel vouchers. Voting has started (on 28 September 2012) and ends on 15 October 2012. Votes can be cast on a daily basis at the My Macau Experience 2012 Voting page.






High on Sky

1 10 2012

Lunch on the third day was to be quite a surprise, the venue for it being high in the Sky above the Macau peninsula. It was on the 21st level of the AIA Tower, at the aptly named Sky 21 to be exact, a destination that as I was to discover, offered more than just a great dining experience in a room with a view.

Sky 21 is a surprise that awaits on the 21st and 22nd floors of the AIA Tower in Macau. Sky Life – an action and entertainment venue on the 22nd floor is seen here (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The sign at the entrance to Sky 21 (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Much of the decor found in the MOP 20 million dining and entertainment venue is Zen inspired (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Stepping through into the restaurant, the view offered not only out the windows but of the restaurant itself was a pretty eye-catching one. The 80 seat main dining area’s Zen inspired décor, was certainly one with a lot of appeal. It was at a private room where we were to have lunch, and stepping inside, it did not take very long for the cameras to come out. The views out the window and the room itself certainly seemed to catch the fancy of everyone in the group. The VIP Room accommodates a maximum of 16 people, and can be reserved for private events such as birthday parties, private dining, and small meetings and is equipped with a private restroom, projector and screen.

The Zen inspired decor seen in the main dining area (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The VIP Room is a room that certainly has a view (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The southward view from the VIP Room (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Decor inside the VIP Room.

The lunch menu at Sky 21 offers a selection of set meals, a Pan-Asian selection that gives diners a choice of Macanese, Chinese, Indonesian, Thai, Indian, Japanese and Vietnamese. I decided on the Japanese which proved to be an excellent choice, as was the various other choices made by the other in the group. After a common raw tuna salad that was served, my set was served. Beautifully arranged on a tray, it had a bowl of a crab roe salad with aloe, another of udon noodles in soup with Japanese roast pork, a generous serving of sushi, and a rather attractively presented slice of wasabi cheesecake.

Inside the VIP Room (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Choices, choices! Willy probably wishes he could order everything on the menu (i did too!) (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The Japanese set that I ordered (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The Wasabi cheesecake – yummy!

Valyn staring into her dessert – one that came with the Macanese set.

Being one who eats first and asks questions later, I will leave reviewing the food to one of my favourite food bloggers, Yiwei. I can however say that the food certainly did not disappoint and is very good value based on the prices that were on the menu.

The food review is best left to food blogger Yiwei.

There was some time for a small presentation of prizes to the winners of the previous day’s race through the streets of old Macau at which no one came away disappointed. Even with the team I was in coming in an embarrassing last, Kaika (my teammate) and I did receive a prize – for a photo posted during the race. The prizes were presented by Iris of the Macau Government Tourist Office (MGTO) in Singapore, who we have to thank for making the trip such a wonderful experience. The MGTO were the kind sponsors of the trip, with Tiger Airways, which flies to Macau daily, sponsoring the flights to and from Macau.

Iris announcing who the winners of the race were (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

A shot of my race teammate Kaika.

Valyn showing the prize that she got … (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

A short tour followed of the MOP 20 million luxury dining, shopping and entertainment destination, which is not only on the 21st floor AIA Tower, but also extends one floor up to the 22nd floor. On the same level as the restaurant, we were to discover a surprise that was hidden in a room behind closed doors – an exclusive luxury retail showroom that is reserved for Sky’s VIP guests. Designed to attract the big spender, there is a selection of hard-to-find luxury goods on offer behind the showcases … something that certainly opened the eyes of the ladies in the group (and most of the men too)! Access to the showroom can also be made via a concierge service that is available through one of the Suncity group VIP rooms which can be found in all Macau 5 star Casinos.

Inside Sky Luxe (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Leaving Sky Luxe behind, we went up a flight of stairs to the 22nd level where we got a look at Sky Life, an action and entertainment venue which offers live entertainment and features guest DJs; and also the SKY B bar and lounge with an open terrace which has great views of Macau Tower and of the area around the Grand Lisboa. The two outlets do also offer dining – a semi-buffet Western Excutive Lunch is available as well as a Classic / Asian Afternoon Tea. Both certainly are cool places I wouldn’t at all mind an evening out in.

Sky B is a bar on the 22nd level (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The open terrace of Sky B offers magnificent views of the area around Macau Tower … (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5) …

… and the skyscrapers around the Grand Lisboa (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Another view of Sky B (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

At this point I would like to express my appreciation to Sky 21 for the scrumptious lunch and also for showing what a wonderful concept Sky is all about. It certainly is a place to see and also be seen in. More information on Sky 21 can be found at its website (click here).


Links to getting high:

Macau Government Tourist Office
Tiger Airways
Sky 21


Note: this is a repost of my post on the omy.sg My Macau Experience 2012 site which sees 10 bloggers share experiences of their visit to Macau. Readers will get a chance to vote for their favourite My Macau Experience 2012 blogger and stand a chance to win $1000 worth of Macau travel vouchers. Voting starts on 28 September 2012 and details can be found at the My Macau Experience 2012 Voting page.






Macau: a celebration of contrasts

24 09 2012

Having spent a amazing four days in Macau courtesy of the Macau Government Tourist Office (MGTO) and Tiger Airways, I was able to see for myself the wonderment that is packed into the 29 square kilometres of the tiny former Portuguese territory. It is for me a world certainly worth exploring, a world which is more than just that unique blend of east and west we have come to expect, but also a fascinating world where two other worlds, the glitzy new world has collided with the charming old world. With the two now forced into a tight embrace, it is in the compact territory where contrasts, and as one might see it the contradiction of new with old, are as apparent as black and white, black and white as is how it looks to me:


The celebration of the new world:

A scene from Franco Dragone’s The House of Dancing Water playing at the City of Dreams.

The Outer Harbour with the Friendship Bridge and the waterfront at Fisherman’s Wharf at the break of day (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The waterfront at Fisherman’s Wharf at the break of day (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Breakfast at the Café Bela Vista in the Grand Lapa Macau (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The Roman Amphitheatre at Fisherman’s Wharf (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Daybreak over the Roman Amphitheatre (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The Ponte Governador Nobre de Carvalho as seen from Sky 21.

Bottles behind a frosted glass counter, Sky 21.

A new arrival embracing the arrival of the new day in the new world.


Windows into the old world:

The window into an unseen side of Macau – the quays at the Inner Harbour (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

A window from the past … louvered windows seen at the Taipa Houses-Museum, which is housed in a set of charming old colonial houses at Taipa Village.

Fish being dried in the sun.

A street named happiness, the Rua da Felicidade.

An almond cookie maker on the street of happiness.

Almond cookie samples to be offered to passers-by near the ruins of St. Paul’s.

A street food vendor.

A side street near the street of happiness.

Shutters of an old shop (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

Street scene.

Barra Square.

East meets West and old meets new: A western couple leaving the A-Ma Temple.

A fortune teller at the A-Ma Temple.

An archway under a building along an old street of Macau.

A car workshop in an old shophouse.

A female worker at an old building being refurbished.

Disused pellets by the quayside at the Inner Harbour.

Where two worlds are made to collide: the bow of a ship peeks out at the Inner Harbour.

Coloane Village scene (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

A square in Coloane Village (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).

The writing on the wall in Taipa Village (photograph taken with a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF5).


The visit to Macau was made possible by the kind sponsorship of MGTO, flights were sponsored by Tiger Airways with check-in baggage allowances included.


Useful Links:

Macau Government Tourist Office
Tiger Airways


Note: this is a repost of my post on the omy.sg My Macau Experience 2012 site which sees 10 bloggers share experiences of their visit to Macau. Readers will get a chance to vote for their favourite My Macau Experience 2012 blogger and stand a chance to win $1000 worth of Macau travel vouchers. Voting starts on 28 September 2012 and details can be found at the My Macau Experience 2012 Voting page.






Macau on a high

16 09 2012

That it was going to be an interesting 4 day trip to Macau, there wasn’t any doubt. What with it being my very first trip there, plus the added bonus of being in the company of nine very highly spirited bloggers, two members of the omy.sg team and a representative from trip sponsors, the Macau Government Tourist Office (MGTO). It all began on a Saturday morning with what has to be my last check-in at the Budget Terminal (it is scheduled to close on 25 September 2012). A very smooth and hassle free flight of just over 3 hours on flight sponsors Tiger Airways, one of two airlines that flies direct to the territory and the only one that has daily flights there, was all it took, and we soon found ourselves walking down the ladder right onto the tarmac of Macau’s very unique airport on the sea.

Boarding the Tiger Airways flight bound for Macau. Tiger Airways is the only carrier which flies daily to Macau (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

Inside the very comfortable cabin of the Tiger Airways Airbus A320 (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

It didn’t take long before we found ourselves taking in the gorgeous views that any drive across the Friendship Bridge offers and in no time we were dropped off at the hotel’s doorstep. The hotel that we were staying at over the 3 nights, the Grand Lapa Macau, a five-star hotel in the Mandarin Oriental group located close to the Outer Harbour Ferry Terminal on the Macau Peninsula, is a luxuriously decorated resort hotel which is set in a very relaxing garden setting. Having checked –in, there wasn’t time to really appreciate what the hotel offered until later, as with some of my new-found friends and travel companions, we decided on looking for a quick bite – something that perhaps set the tone for the culinary adventures that lay in wait.

The room in the Grand Lapa Macau which I found myself in (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The beautiful setting of the Café Bela Vista in the Grand Lapa where breakfast is served (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

Too many choices for our Y-blogger Joey – as some of us decided to grab a quick bite before heading out (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

First bite – the much talked about Pork Chop bun (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

Having momentarily satisfied cravings that were to accompany me for the rest of the trip, it was time to set off for the first adventures that the MGTO had in store for us. This was to take us on a high – up the heights of the tallest structure in Macau, Macau Tower, which soars to a height of 338 metres and is currently the 20th tallest tower in the world. It would be at the tower where we were to have dinner at the tower’s revolving restaurant, the 360° Café and also where we were to catch the opening of the 24th International Macau Fireworks Display Contest at the tower’s Outdoor Plaza.

Macau Tower at a height of 338 metres is the tallest structure in the territory (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The tower is a truly fascinating place – a lot more than just an observation tower that offers magnificent views of the Special Administrative Region and Zhuhai in mainland China and the Pearl River Delta, but a location that offers dining, entertainment as well as convention and exhibition facilities as we were to discover in the company of Money, which took the form of a Macau Tower representative named Money.

Macau Tower offers excellent views of Macau and the Peral River Delta.

We first had an introduction to the Grand Hall in the convention centre located next to the base of the tower. The Grand Hall is a huge hall that accommodates up to 1800 people for seminars and 1000 people for banquets which can be divided into 8 smaller halls. There are also private rooms arranged along the outer edge – rooms with a view offering a magnificent view of the Sai Van Bridge, more popularly referred to as the ‘M & M’ Bridge for the shape of the arches on the pylons, for private functions. Interestingly, the bridge, which is the 3rd bridge to be built linking the island of Taipa to the Macau Peninsula, has two decks – an open upper deck which is normally used and an enclosed lower deck that is opened up during typhoons.

Chairs inside the Grand Hall (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The Macau Tower representative, Money, introducing the tower’s convention facilities to the group.

Private rooms are arranged on the outside (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The rooms provides a beautiful view of the ‘M&M’ or Sai Van Bridge (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The view of the Sai Van Bridge we got from the private rooms (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

It was then time to get high … and in some 50 seconds we were transported up via high-speed elevators with a maximum speed of 5 metres per second up the 223 metres to the lower Indoor Observation Deck of the tower on the 58th floor. And if that wasn’t exhilarating enough, the fully air-conditioned Indoor Observation Deck, besides offering sky-high views of the surroundings, has thick glass floor panels fitted in some areas that offers the sensation of walking with nothing but 223 metres of air below one’s feet and is certain to make one’s legs go soft.

223 metres high with nothing but a thick pane of glass below me (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

And, if that isn’t enough, Macau Tower offers several unique experiences for the thrill seeking height defying visitor. Up on the upper observation deck – the Outdoor Adventure View Deck, visitors have the choice of ascending the mast, walking exposed to the elements along the edge of the tower, or even jumping off … activities that are certainly not for the faint hearted! It is from this deck, some 61 floors up that A J Hackett, a pioneer in commercial bungy jumping, runs the four activities that will at the very least provide some adrenaline moments, the Mast Climb, the Skywalk X and the Bungy Jump and the Skyjump. The Bungy Jump which at 233 metres up is ranked as the second highest commercial bungee jump in the world and which has been identified as one of the top 5 bungee jumps to do takes one down the tower and offers some spectacular views … something I might have thought of doing if it weren’t for time (yeah, right!). We did get a chance to watch as one very brave man went through his preparations before taking the plunge – wearing a look of calm (or maybe putting on a brave face) throughout. There is also a slower more controlled descent 20 second one can make – the Skyjump, if the bungee is not for you.

The Outdoor Adventure View Deck (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The view from the Outdoor Adventure View Deck (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The Mast Climb allows visitors to climb up the mast (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

A couple of brave souls being prepared for the Bungy Jump and Skywalk (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

Must be a wonderful experience being out there and seeing the sunset.

Giving the thumbs up! (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

Taking the plunge.

A participant being guided along the Skywalk (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

Skywalk participants get to sit on the edge some 233 metres above ground!

It was soon time to move down to the 60th level where the 360° Café is located to indulge in its huge buffet spread. It did seem like the one hour we had for dinner wasn’t quite enough to fully savour the scrumptious spread of Macanese, Portuguese, Cantonese and even Indian delights plus take the time to view and photograph the wonderful views we were dining to, before it was time to head down for the opening of the Macau International Fireworks Display Contest. On the evidence of the ladies seated at my table, the dessert spread was very well received … including tiramisu to die for – that alone I suppose makes the dining experience one that, for also the delicious spread and wonderful views, is one that should not be missed when in Macau.

The buffet at 360° Café includes local favourites (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The dessert spread was popular with the ladies in the group (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The experience at Macau Tower is certainly a great way to start off the adventure we were to have in Macau, and was one that provided a wonderful first impression of the surprises that Macau holds. We soon found ourselves seated right below the tower ready for the next segment of an eventful first evening, the opening of the 24th Macau International Fireworks Display Contest to which I would devote the next post to.

The view of the Pearl River Delta and the ‘M&M’ Bridge was spectacular from the revolving restaurant (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).

The ‘M&M’ or Sai Van Bridge features an enclosed lower deck for use during typhoons (photo taken with a Panasonic LUMIX GF-5 camera).


The visit to Macau was made possible by the kind sponsorship of MGTO including sponsorship of our stay at the Grand Lapa Macau, flights have been sponsored by Tiger Airways with check-in baggage allowances included. The visit to Macau Tower and dinner at 360° Café was also made possible by Macau Tower.


Useful links:

Macau Government Tourist Office
Tiger Airways
Grand Lapa Macau
Macau Tower
360° Café
A J Hackett
Bungy Jump
Skyjump
Skywalk X
Mast Climb


Note: this is a repost of my post on the omy.sg My Macau Experience 2012 site which sees 10 bloggers share experiences of their visit to Macau. Readers will get a chance to vote for their favourite My Macau Experience 2012 blogger and stand a chance to win $1000 worth of Macau travel vouchers. Voting starts on 28 September 2012 and details can be found at the My Macau Experience 2012 Voting page.






A new world in an old to discover

7 09 2012

I’ll soon be off on a new adventure to a place that I have only seen in pictures, Macau. It will be one that I certainly am looking forward to, given the opportunities that will be presented to photograph its wonderful diversity of culture and architecture in the former Portuguese colony.

Macau, one of the earliest European colonies in Asia, and also the longest held, offers and interesting blend of east and west.

The adventure will be one that I will take in the company of an equally diverse group of bloggers, diverse from the age range and areas of interest. That in itself promises to make the four day trip, kindly sponsored by the Macau Government Tourist Office (MGTO), with flights there sponsored by Tiger Airways which flies there everyday. The itinerary is also one that makes the trip one to look forward to. MGTO has lined up an exciting programme that will include visits to some of the main attractions such as Macau Tower, Macau Grand Prix Museum and Wine Musuem, the Butterfly Pavilion at MGM Macau, Ice World @ The Venetian Macau, The House of Dancing Water, Coloane Village and Taipa Village. During the time, we will also have an experience of some of the scrumptious cuisine that combines the best of east and west.

Macau Tower and the Macau International Fireworks Display Contest.

The highlight of the trip could possibly be the Macau International Fireworks Display Contest, which is in its 24th year. Held over five Saturdays, the event will see ten teams compete with their creative displays for the top prize – two each evening. We will get to see the first set of teams – from Korea and from Thailand on the first evening – and I hope to see and hopefully photograph a spectacular show that evening.

Senado Square.

One of the things that I will look to be doing – especially with a free afternoon after what should be an interesting Amazing Race style race that is planned for the morning of the second day, would be to explore some of Macau on my own. I would be particularly interested to try to discover the mix of east and west in a territory that was one of the earliest European colonies in the Far East. Macau also is the earliest European colony on Chinese territory and the last to be held by a European nation and is certainly a place that is steeped in the history of the golden age of Portuguese ‘discovery’ in Asia. This is a subject that I have been fascinated with since my introduction to it attending a church in Singapore that traces its history, interestingly enough to the first Catholic missionaries who arrived in Singapore, coming from the Portuguese colony of Macau, as well as in the ruins of the A Famosa and St Paul’s Church in Malacca.

A-Ma Temple.

For more information, and also to follow the ten bloggers on the trip, do visit the My Macau Experience page on omy.sg http://blog.omy.sg/experience-macau. We will be updating with blog posts on our experiences before, (maybe during), and in the few weeks after the trip as well flooding it with instant feeds on Twitter (#sba2012) and Instagram (#surprisingmomentsinmacau) during the trip.


Photographs in this post courtesy of MGTO.