The William Farquhar collection comes alive

7 12 2016

Two years in the making, Story of the Forest – an interactive digital installation that brings 69 drawings of the William Farquhar Collection of Natural History Drawings alive, makes it public debut on Saturday 10 December 2016. The work was commissioned as part of the revamp of the permanent galleries of the National Museum of Singapore for the Glass Rotunda. The scale and curvature of the venue presented huge challenges to the Japanese digital art collective behind it, teamLab and required team of 30 to be assembled. Much of the task, including pre-production, was carried out at teamLab’s base in Japan and this included the construction of a full scale mockup. A large enough warehouse – there apparently was the only one in Tokyo that the mock-up could fit into – was used for the mockup.

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Story of the Forest, by teamLab.

Cascading flowers of Story of the Forest's first segment.

Cascading flowers of Story of the Forest’s first segment.

The interactive second segment that takes visitors down a 170m walkway to the lower rotunda.

The interactive second segment that takes visitors down a 170m walkway to the lower rotunda.

More of the second segment.

More of the second segment.

Deeply inspired by the set of drawings on which the installation draws on for its images, teamLab’s has come up with one of the most amazing of installations that takes visitors on a journey of rediscovery through the rich assembly of flora and fauna that the Farquhar collection so beautifully captures. The Glass Rotunda, an architectural response of the Neo-Palladian rotunda of the museum’s main building, is a huge space to fill. It has a 15 metre high ceiling and a spiral walkway that requires the installation to be stretched across some 170 metres. teamLab response to this is a three segment installation. Cascading flora greets the visitors at the entrance, before the journey begins down the walkway with animals serving as a guide. A mobile app is available to enhance this experience. The app allows the “capture” of animals through the phone’s camera. The climax of the installation is a very dynamic one that takes place at the lower rotunda. Running animals, blooming trees, shooting stars and falling fruits make the experience especially immersive.

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The lower rotunda is also where a second installation can be viewed – that of Robert Zhao’s Singapore, Very Old Tree. 17 photographs of the 30 photographs in the collection are one display. The photographs explore the nation’s identity and uncovers the personal relationships between people and trees.

Singapore, A Very Old Tree.

Singapore, A Very Old Tree.

Admission to the Glass Rotunda (and Permanent Galleries) will be free to all visitors during the opening weekend on 10 and 11 December 2016 (it is also free on a permanent basis for Singaporeans and PRs). A host of activities for the family is also being lined up, more information on which can be found at www.nationalmuseum.sg.

A Patek Phillippe 'Farquhar Collection' Dome table clock donated by Hour Glass. Proceeds from an auction have gone to the revamp of the Glass Rotunda.

A Patek Phillippe ‘Farquhar Collection’ Dome table clock donated by Hour Glass. Proceeds from an auction have gone to the revamp of the Glass Rotunda.

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Second Nature, an interactive and immersive “secret garden” exhibit that features elements from the William Farquhar Collection of Natural History Drawings and reacts to your movements! Visitors are encouraged to participate and engage with the exhibit, as well as contribute to the installation by folding origami flowers and attaching them to a flowering board

Wings

Wings of a Rich Manoeuvre. A permanent installation by Suzann Victor for Swarovski, which was unveiled on 30 Nov 2016.

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A Merry Medley at the Flower Dome

21 11 2016

Coloured by poinsettias, amaryllis and Christmas roses and conifer trees, as well as several Christmas themed decorations and giant snow globes, the Christmas display at the Gardens by the Bay’s Flower Dome is especially pretty this year. The display, Merry Medley, runs until 5 January 2017 and is best view when illuminated at night.

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Fireworks tonight at the Singapore Discovery Centre

19 11 2016

A carnival-like atmosphere awaits visitors to the Singapore Discovery Centre (SDC) today as it celebrates its 20th anniversary with a big birthday bash that will culminate with a burst of fireworks at 8 pm this evening at the close of the party. As part of its celebrations, a special exhibition, the 20/20 Play @ SDC – that celebrates 20 years of National Education – was also launched earlier this afternoon by Dr Teo Ho Pin, Mayor of North West District. The exhibition features a play area that gets visitors to visit games the older folks may have played and provides a feel of the playgrounds of the late 1970s and 1980s.

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Dr Teo, Lowrence Chua, Executive Director of SDC, members of SDC’s staff and a new mascot, SingaPaw, at the launch of 20/20 Play.

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Dr Teo viewing exhibits.

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Dr Teo viewing a recreation of the iconic Toa Payoh Dragon Playground.

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Great music too!





We have lift-off, NASA – A Human Adventure opens today

19 11 2016

Space exploration, fuelled by the cold war rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union, made significant progress in the 1950s and 1960s. As a child of the 1960s, I was caught up in its excitement of it and especially of its most significant outcome – the landing of the first man on the moon in July 1969. The space programmes that led to the landing had itself generated huge interest during the decade. It was a space exploration flavoured decade in many ways and I took great satisfaction in rocket shaped ice-lollies, ice-cream packed in a Mercury spacecraft inspired container and on getting my hands on moon-landing inspired action transfer sets. For a child it seemed a most exciting of times; times that certainly came back to me visiting a preview of NASA – A Human Adventure, which opens today (19 November 2016) at the ArtScience Museum.

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A Mercury Spacecraft, the first US manned spacecraft.

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The exhibition, which is arranged around five galleries, takes visitors into a fascinating journey through space exploration and starts with the dreams humankind had long had of venturing into the unknown. There is an amazing collection of over 200 artefacts on display, several of which have flown in space, connected with both the Soviet and the NASA efforts. There also is get a chance to get up close to several training modules and full or large scale reconstructions of space craft including one of the Space Shuttle’s front section in which the flight deck and the mid-deck – where the crew eats, sleeps and works, complete with a vacuum toilet.

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The first gallery – which tells us all about the Dreamers.

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A re-creation of the Space Shuttle’s Flight Deck.

The Space Race, prompted by the Cold War rivalry between the Soviet Union and the US, is well documented in the second gallery, Go Fever. The intense rivalry provided much impetus for the rapid progress made by both countries in  space exploration and resulted in the first manned flights and the eventual moon landing. A model of Sputnik, the first satellite, which started the Space Race in earnest is on display. The early lead that the Soviets took is also seen in several rarely seen Soviet space artefacts and in a remembrance of the first human in space, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.

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A model of Sputnik – the very first artificial satellite, launched by the Soviet Union. The reflection on it is that of Go Fever, the second gallery.

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The Soviet Space programme put the first man in Space – Yuri Gagarin, who is remembered in Go Fever.

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Soviet space programme artefacts – including a briefcase carried by Yuri Gagarin into space.

The exhibition has three other galleries, Pioneers, Endurance and Innovation – tracing the evolution of rocket technology, how the challenges of space travel were overcome and how ground breaking technologies have been created through the programme. There is also a rather interesting art installation, The Indonesia Space Science Society by Indonesian artist, Venzha Christ that includes a 3 metre sculpture and invites visitors to listen to space.

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A scale-model of the very long Saturn V rocket.

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The Jupiter nose cone – launched into space and recovered from the sea – the experimental nose cone was a crucial step in development of re-entry vehicles – necessary for manned space flights.

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Titan I LR-87 rocket engine.

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The installation by Venzha Christ.

A highlight of the exhibition is the G-Force Astronaut Trainer ride, which simulates the flight of the 1961 Liberty Bell 7 with forces of up to 2G. The ride takes up to four and costs $6 on weekdays (Mondays to Thursdays) and $9 during the weekends.

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The G-Force Astronaut Trainer Ride.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the ArtScience Museum is also running the Art and Science of Space season. Several programmes are lined up including an Insights Tour during the opening weekend, given by Jukka Nurminen – an avid aeronautics enthusiast and the producer and curator of the exhibition. Two sessions will be held at 11.30am  lasting an hour on 19 and 20 Nov, which will be complimentary to ticket holders but limited to 25 per session (stickers will be given out 5 minutes before the tour begins). There are also public guided tours on 25 Nov at 3-4pm and on 27 Nov at 11.30am-12.30pm. A series of workshops will also be held. The exhibition runs until 19 March 2017 and more information on it, its programmes and ticketing can be found at the exhibition’s website.

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Jukka Nurminen, Producer and Curator of the exhibition.


More exhibits:

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Spacesuits.

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A Soviet lunar vehicle.

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Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle.

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Moon rock collection case, bags, a glove and a boot.

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An Apollo survival kit.

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Command compartment of a Gemini Spacecraft.

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A command module.

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Apollo Command Module.

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Space Shuttle front section.

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An actual unused leg for the Apollo lunar landing module

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Film shot by Apollo astronauts.

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A Hasselblad camera of the type used for lunar operations.

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TV camera of type used for lunar operations.

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Lithium hydroxide canister for removing carbon dioxide. This featured in the Apollo 13 near tragedy that left the Command Module with limited electricity supply. To save power in the Command Module that was crucial for reentry, the Lunar Module was kept attached as a “lifeboat”. The Lunar Module did not have sufficient LiOH canisters and ground engineers very quickly found a way make join the rectangular canisters from the Command Module to the cylindrical canisters of the Lunar Module.

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An flight computer – which weighed about 100 kg.

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A photograph of the Apollo Lunar Module.

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A replica of the module with the triangular window seen in the photograph above.

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An actual Command Module parachute for descent back to earth – notice the burns from reentry on it.

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A heavily built Command Module front hatch.

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Models of Hubble and the ISS.





The Singapore Biennale 2016

2 11 2016

The 5th edition of the Singapore Biennale,”An Atlas of Mirrors”,  opened last week. Running until 26 February 2017, this year’s edition features works by 63 artists and art collectives from 19 countries and territories across Southeast Asia, East and South Asia that have a strong element of history in them. Curated around nine sub-themes the works are being displayed across eight locations with the Singapore Art Museum and SAM at 8Q as anchor venues. More information on the programmes, venues, artwork and ticketing can be found at the Singapore Biennale 2016’s website.

The Great East Indiaman by David Chan on the National Museum of Singapore's front lawn.

The Great East Indiaman by David Chan on the National Museum of Singapore’s front lawn.

Giving art a finger - Lim Soo Ngee's Inscription of the Island.

Giving art a finger – Lim Soo Ngee’s Inscription of the Island.


A selection of installations

Titarubi - History Repeats Itself at SAM. Featuring robes of gold coated nutmegs, it recalls the legacy of colonial conquest. to facilitate the control of the valuable trade in a spice said to have been worth its weight in gold.

Titarubi – History Repeats Itself at SAM. Featuring robes of gold coated nutmegs, it recalls the legacy of colonial conquest. to facilitate the control of the valuable trade in a spice said to have been worth its weight in gold.

The dreams of a Shaman's wife. Tcheu Siong, a Hmong shaman's wife has her dreams reinterpreted as 'story' clothes in which one finds the spirits she sees in her dreams, represented by the lanky figures alongside representations of mountains, humans and animals.

At SAM, the dreams of a Shaman’s wife. Tcheu Siong, a Hmong shaman’s wife has her dreams reinterpreted as ‘story’ clothes in which one finds the spirits she sees in her dreams, represented by the lanky figures alongside representations of mountains, humans and animals.

Also presented alongside are the works of Tcheu Siong's husband, Phasao Lao.

Also presented alongside are History, the works of Tcheu Siong’s husband, Phasao Lao.

Paracosmos by Harumi Yukutake at the SAM.

Paracosmos by Harumi Yukutake at the SAM.

Rubbish by Kentaro Hiroki, which features recreated items of rubbish picked by the artist.. On display at both SAM and 8Q.

Rubbish by Kentaro Hiroki, which features recreated items of rubbish picked by the artist.. On display at both SAM and 8Q.

Rubbish attrracting a crowd at SAM.

Rubbish attrracting a crowd at SAM.

Another view of Inscription of the Island, by Lim Soo Ngee.

Another view of Inscription of the Island, by Lim Soo Ngee.

Freakily leeky - Chia Chuyia's Knitting the Future at 8Q. The artist knits leeks to create a body length garment over a five week period. Leeks, as a food item, hold significance to the Teochew community to which the artist belongs.

Freakily leeky – Chia Chuyia’s Knitting the Future at 8Q. The artist knits leeks to create a body length garment over a five week period. Leeks, as a food item, hold significance to the Teochew community to which the artist belongs.

Knitting the Future.

Knitting the Future.

Rathin Barman's Home, and a Home, inspired by the experiences of the migrant Bangladeshi community in Singapore.

Rathin Barman’s Home, and a Home, inspired by the experiences of the migrant Bangladeshi community in Singapore.

Melissa Tan and her If you can dream a better world you can make a better world or perhaps travel between them.

Melissa Tan and her If you can dream a better world you can make a better world or perhaps travel between them.

Music boxes - which feature impressions made by physical features are part of teh installation.

Music boxes – which feature impressions made by physical features are part of the installation.

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The Great East Indiaman features a recreation of the whale skeleton that once hung inside the National Museum of Singapore in wood.

The Great East Indiaman features a recreation of the whale skeleton that once hung inside the National Museum of Singapore in wood.





In Singapore: The amazing human tower builders of Catalonia

20 10 2016

A Catalonian tradition that dates back to the 1700s, a human tower or castell building performance is being seen for the first time in Southeast in Asia. One of the many rich and interesting cultural practices of Spain as a whole, and of Catalonia, the tradition – usually performed on important festivals, is inscribed in the UNESCO Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

The Minyons de Terrassa at Kidzania, Sentosa.

Close to 300 castellers from the Minyons de Terrassa are in Singapore, brought in by Qatar Airways and the Catalonia Tourism Board. The group has recently broken the world record for the biggest human tower ever built.

Practice makes perfect.

Practice makes perfect.

The building of castells involve a huge group forming the all important base on top of which tiers of more castellers are progressively built up, supported by the shoulders of those in the tiers below. The bigger built of the castellers form the lower tiers with brave young children climbing higher up to form the summit.

Forming the base.

Forming the base.

Forming the lower tier.

The Minyons de Terrassa, who have performed at Raffles Place on 19 October and at Kidzania in Sentosa today, will hold two more performances tomorrow, 21 October 2016, at 4.30 pm for ITB Asia at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Centre and again at 5.30 pm at Customs House. On another note, Qatar Airways, flies from Singapore to Barcelona (and Madrid) via Doha’s Hamad International Airport. The airlines is offering special fares, which start from SGD 945, until 24 October 2016 for travel until 30 June 2017.

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Ancient music in Jackie Chan’s ancient houses

20 10 2016

A most delightful gift to Singapore made by Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan is the set of four structures that now grace the campus of the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) at Somapah. Dating back to the Ming and Qing dynasties, the structures were originally from Zhejiang province in China. A chance to have a look at them came with a Nanyin performance by the Siong Leng Musical Association held in the structures that I was invited to recently.

Ancient music in ancient structures. A performance by the Siong Leng Musical Association held in a main hall that was part of a house from Zhejiang.

Ancient music in ancient structures. A performance by the Siong Leng Musical Association held in a main hall that was part of a house from Zhejiang.

Part of a collection of ten ancient structures purchased by martial arts star with the intention that they be dismantled and re-erected as a home for his parents, the structures were put in storage for much longer than was intended. Little was documented on the assembly of the structures, which proved a challenge when the university looked at reassembling them.

The pavilion.

The pavilion.

The structures feature some rather interesting and previously unseen features in Singapore in which many Chinese structures are of the Minnan style. An examples of this is the exquisitely carved oversized wooden corbels seen in one of the structures, a late Qing dynasty pavilion. The pavilion, interestingly, also features a mix of styles seen in the wooden balustrades with a Suzhou flavour.

The Suzhou style is also seen in some of the features of the pavilion.

The Suzhou style is also seen in some of the features of the pavilion.

Close to the pavilion, another of the structures – an opera stage, has an interesting feature on its ceiling – a dome of sorts that acts to enhance the stage acoustics.

A feature on the ceiling of the opera stage that enhances the stage's acoustics.

A feature on the ceiling of the opera stage that enhances the stage’s acoustics.

Hokkien opera on an ancient opera stage.

Hokkien opera on an ancient opera stage.

A close-up.

A close-up.

There are also two structures, complementing parts of a Ming dynasty house and a Qing dynasty house, that have been put together in the setting of a lake. Featuring a mix of old and new in the glass panels that keep the air-conditioning in, the parts which have only a small difference in width, find harmony even if they were from different houses and from different times. The parts are a main hall and an inner hall where bedrooms would have been located. An interesting contrast between the two are the finished wooden columns seen in the main hall where guests would be entertained and the coarser looking (and less costly) unfinished columns in the inner more private area.

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In the inner hall.

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The two parts of two houses, complementing each other in the setting of a lake.

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The opera stage by night.

A carved corbel on the stage.

A carved corbel on the stage.

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